The Newsletter Pro - December 2019

208.297.5700 DEC

2019 www.thenewsletterpro.com

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

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The YOU Doctrine Even Google Gets the Hiring Blues Business Book Review Stop Monkeying Around and Start Collecting Data

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Meet Mytch Evangelista

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How One App Is Helping Students Afford College

HOW TO CREATE A WORKPLACE BOTH YOU AND YOUR EMPLOYEES LOVE

equals-three concept at play at some point. It’s that employee who just seems to knock it out of the park for you all of the time. You keep piling more onto their plate, and they keep killing it. Some of these people may be leaders in your company now. What would your company look like if all your employees were superstars? Don’t misunderstand me — I’m not suggesting you pay average employees more, nor am I suggesting that, as a country, we raise the minimum wage because everyone deserves a “livable wage.” What I’m saying is that when you have a superstar, shouldn’t they make more money? Let’s take it a step further. What if every one of your employees was a superstar? Would they all be worth 150% of the current average rate? Let me ask you one more question. Who would you rather have taking care of your customers — an average

I have read extensively about conscious capitalism and many of the above companies, trying to find a vision and path for myself and my team at The Newsletter Pro, and I’ve found we definitely march to the beat of our own drum when it comes to conscious capitalism. One mistake I see many business owners make is to keep all the marbles for themselves. As I type this, I can even hear some of my buddies’ voices saying, “But Shaun, I took all the risk, and I built this business. These employees are simply here today and gone tomorrow.” Some of those statements may be true, but they’re viewing business as a zero-sum game where either you win or your employees win. Can’t it be a win-win? The founder of The Container Store, Kip Tindell, has a saying: One equals three. In other words, one great employee equals three average employees, so it is cheaper for him to pay a great employee 150% or more of the industry average wage to keep them around. I believe most of us have seen the one-

Have you ever interacted with a business and known they were different? Take Zappos.com, for example. If you’ve shopped there before, you know they’re a step above other online retailers. Maybe it’s the free return shipping they offer if you’re not happy with your item. Costco is another good example. Their employees all seem to be happy and helpful, and the return policy is amazing. I find myself buying items there that I wouldn’t buy otherwise simply because I know I can return them if I don’t like them. I could go on and on with other examples, like The Container Store, Whole Foods, and Southwest Airlines, but you get the point. Some companies are just different. Why is that? One way to describe the above companies is with the term “conscious capitalism.” Conscious companies use a marketing strategy that displays awareness of the effects of their actions, and they implement practices that benefit their employees, customers, and the environment. This term was coined by John Mackey and Raj Sisodia in their book, “Conscious Capitalism.”

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