Blue Diamond Almond Facts March-April 2022

NEWS, VIEWS, AND INDUSTRY INSIGHT

MARCH–APRIL 2022

COMING SOON! Elote and Korean BBQ Flavored Almonds

COMING SOON: Elote and Korean BBQ!

Shamrock’n Race Returned to Sacramento

Challenges at Port Persist

Blue Diamond Growers does not endorse or verify statements made by advertisers within this publication.

MAR–APR 2022

Contents

8 FIELD TEAM 10 NEWS IN A NUTSHELL 18 CORNERING THE MARKET 20 GROWING THE GOODNESS 24 ADVOCACY REPORT 28 CULTIVATING SUSTAINABILITY 32 IN YOUR ORCHARD 42 CLASSIFIED ADS

Korean BBQ

Elote

Head to your local Walmart this May to pick up two delicious, new flavors!

Features 6 President’s Corner

22 Shamrock’n Race is Back! After a two-year break due to the pandemic, Blue Diamond was deeply proud to, once again, act as the sponsor of Shamrock’n Half Marathon Event. 38 Global Supply Chain Update Blue Diamond ’s VP of Global Supply, Steve Schult, provides an update on the ongoing challenges the industry is facing. Through it all, our co-op remains strong and focused.

Our President/CEO, Mark Jansen provides highlights the happenings over the past couple months while looking forward to the next season for Blue Diamond. 18 COMING SOON! Elote and Korean BBQ Almonds Two exciting new flavors will be hitting Walmart shelves this May: Elote (Mexican-style street corn) and Korean BBQ.

ON THE COVER: Blue Diamond is excited to welcome our newest flavors this April: Elote and Korean BBQ.

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS Dan Cummings, Chairman of the Board | Chico Stephen Van Duyn, Vice Chairman | Modesto Dale Van Groningen | Ripon John Monroe | Arbuckle George A. te Velde | Escalon Nick Blom | Modesto Dan Mendenhall | Winton

Matthew Efird | Fresno Kent Stenderup | Arvin Joe Huston | Monterey Kristin Daley | San Francisco

OFFICERS Mark Jansen, President and CEO Dean LaVallee, Chief Financial Officer/ Chief Operating Officer

Blue Diamond , the world’s largest processor and marketer of almonds, exports to over 100 countries. Almond Facts , established in 1922, is published bimonthly by Blue Diamond Growers , 1802 C Street, Sacramento, California 95811. Address all correspondence to the Editor, Almond Facts , P.O. Box 1768, Sacramento, California 95812. Advertising subscription rates provided upon request. Blue Diamond is a registered trademark and marketing brand of Blue Diamond Growers . Other registered trademarks are The Almond People, Smokehouse, Golden State, Celebration, From the Valleys of California, Confetti and Almond Facts . Blue Diamond Growers does not endorse or verify statements made by advertisers within this publication. Blue Diamond reserves the right to refuse advertising. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. ALMOND FACTS STAFF Blue Diamond Growers Communications Department, communications@bdgrowers.com Jillian Luna, Managing Editor Mel Machado, Contributing Photographer Gray Allen, Advertising Sales 916.783.4334 & 916.765.3234

© Blue Diamond Growers 2022

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PRESIDENT’S CORNER

Weathering the Challenges

The old adage, “March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb” seems especially appropriate this spring. The unpredictable weather patterns over the last few months will certainly play a critical role in the success and size of this year’s crop.

Unseasonably warm weather that accelerated almond bloom, followed by significant frost events across the state, was an unfortunate combination that resulted in freeze damage to many growers’ orchards. While the extent of impact is still being assessed as I write this, growers in the Sacramento Valley were particularly affected. Our advocacy work through the Almond Alliance to secure disaster declaration for the impacted counties should bring growers much needed assistance. I also want to acknowledge the increased costs you are incurring on production inputs such as gas, diesel and fertilizer as well as the services and equipment needed to deliver your almonds. Fortunately, as you have demonstrated countless times throughout my tenure as your CEO, Blue Diamond growers are both resilient and resourceful. These attributes were highlighted through conversations I had with many of you during my recent visits with groups of growers throughout the valley. Through the strength of our growers and our co-op partnerships, I’m confident we’ll be able to face upcoming challenges and stay focused on maximizing grower returns. Speaking of partners, as part of Women’s History Month in March, we were honored to have four Blue Diamond growers — Cathy Marsh, Kelli Evans, Christine Gemperle, and Samantha Lewis — participate in a video discussion session with our team members. The group shared personal insights about life in the orchard and their roles as women leaders in ag

and business. I want to personally thank those four inspiring women again for taking the time out of their busy schedules to share with our team. It was nice to see that, this year, National Agriculture Day and California Agriculture Day were recognized back-to-back on March 22 and 23 respectively. We certainly appreciate any opportunity to shine a spotlight on the importance of the ag industry and America’s hard-working farmers and ranchers. The message themes for both days focused on sustainability and climate change — the national theme was “Growing a Climate for Tomorrow,” and the state theme was “Working lands. Human hands. Healthy plans.” With the impressive level of grower participation in Blue Diamond ’s Orchard Stewardship Incentive Program, our co-op has a great story to tell around sustainability. Key metrics and narrative being developed across all areas of the co-op will be captured in our first Sustainability Report to be released this November in conjunction with our co-op’s standard Annual Report. As you can see on the cover of this magazine issue, Blue Diamond is rolling out two new snack nut flavors in early summer — Korean BBQ and Elote. We’ve heard fantastic reviews of both, and I’m thrilled that we’re once again pushing the envelope of innovation to remain relevant with our consumers and deliver added value to our growers.

Mark Jansen President & CEO

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A L M O N D F A C T S

I’m exceedingly proud of how committed our Blue Diamond team members are to the success of the cooperative and to our collective mission of support for grower families. The team continues to expand market opportunities while navigating complex supply chain and logistics challenges to ensure your almonds get into the hands of customers and consumers around the world. You’ll find updates about shipping challenges and potential solutions in articles from the Almond Alliance and our own VP of Global Supply Chain in this issue. With the 2022 bloom complete, the focus returns on ensuring adequate water supplies to meet orchard needs. Above average temperatures in mid-March have amplified discussions of a California drought situation again this summer. But just as spring is a time of renewal, hope and new growth, perhaps the unpredictable weather will surprise us once again. After all, I believe the best is yet to come.

Mark Jansen President & CEO

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FIELD TEAM

Regional Managers

Vice President Member Relations Mel Machado

Glenn, Butte, Tehama, Placer, Yuba & Sutter Christine Ivory, (530) 518-9109

Colusa, Yolo & Solano John Aja, (530) 338-6440 Sacramento, Calaveras, Alameda & San Joaquin West of Austin Rd Ben Goudie, (209) 225-0413 Stanislaus County North of Tuolumne River & West of San Joaquin River Justin Elam, (209) 303-7306 San Joaquin East of Austin Rd; Stanislaus South of Tuolumne, East of San Joaquin River & West of Hwy 99; Merced North of the Merced River, West of Hwy 99 KC Stone, (209) 596-5375 Stanislaus South of Tuolumne River, East of 99 & Merced North of Merced River, East of 99) Brian Noeller, (209) 417-2010 Merced County, West of 99 & South of Merced River, East of 99, North of Hwy 140 Trent Voss, (209) 470-5981 Merced County, South of Hwy 140 & Madera County, North of Ave 12 Kenny Miyamoto, (209) 323-8454 Southern Madera County & Northern Fresno County Ashley Correia, (559) 356-1584 Southern Fresno & Kings Counties Meggie Gilbert, (559) 470-9731 Tulare & Kern Counties Meggie Gilbert, (559) 470-9731 Membership Office Jennifer Claussen – Membership Coordinator (209) 545-6225 Daniel Dekeyrel – Membership Assistant ( Delivery Tags ) (209) 545-6261 Grower Accounting Joe Lavagnino – Grower Accounting Manager (916) 446-8491 Kristie Ezell – Grower Accounting Coordinator (916) 446-8368 Erika Martin – Grower Accounting Assistant (916) 446-8385

(209) 545-6222 – Salida (209) 531-6352 – Cellular Director Member Relations Ben Goudie (209) 225-0413

Sutter

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A L M O N D F A C T S

2022 Grower Liaisons

LEGEND

DISTRICT 1

DISTRICT 2

P. Samantha Lewis Chris Alves Luke Konyn Robert Thill Brian Erickson Stacy Gore Jerry Montz Steve Carlos Fred Montgomery Daniel Varner Greg Overton Julie Boss Dan Cummings W. Howard Isom

Cathy Marsh Sid La Grande

Chairman Vice-Chairman Ex-Of ficio Director Appointed (Member-at-Large)

Joe Martinez Sarah Pippit t Maryann Warmerdam Don Bransford

Almond Board Alternate Almond Board Director Almond Board Chair

Ryan Finnen Brian Cahill Jake Driver Ron Tadlock Jake Spooner Amy Abele John Monroe

Elaine Rominger Gerald Rominger

DISTRICT 3

DISTRICT 4

Nick Alta Chris Rishwain Jack Dalton Don Van Vliet Rick Phillips Louie Tallerico

John Almeida Phil Mohler Jake Sonke Bryan Van Groningen Kevin Van Laar

Rick Morris Paul Adrian Wayne Bruns Tim Roos Mike Ballatore Dawn Price Ian Koetsier George te Velde

Mike Boget ti Allen Sipma Bert Van Ryn Rudy Mussi Zack Reinstein Dale Van Groningen John Thoming

For Grower Liaison contact information, please contact your regional manager.

Kevin Fondse Kenneth Roos

DISTRICT 5

DISTRICT 6

DISTRICT 8

DISTRICT 9

DISTRICT 7

Eric Heinrich Naomi A. Layland Alex Vanderstoel Ryan Valk John De Visser Manuel Furtado Lucas Van Duyn Grant Ardis Brandon Riddle Mark Giannini Dennis Bowers Stephen Van Duyn Neil Van Duyn

Christine Gemperle Don Clark

David Tolmosof f Robert Allen Jens Finderup RJ Maan Ryan Indart Lee Erickson Norman Pretzer

Mark Fanucchi Doug Kindig Ray Van Beek Mark Palla Gurcharan Dhillon Kyle Balakian Keith Gilbert Karamjit Jhandi Mark Tos Benjamin Wilson Paramjit Dosanjh

Frank Fagundes Jef frey Baize Tim Lohman Rick Scoto Galen Miytamoto

Jared Serpa Hal Carlton Frank Borba Trent Voss Michael Mora Paul Danbom Eric Genzoli Rod Vilas

Joe Sansoni Jimmi Atwal

Steve Bains Mike Yager Neil Amaral Mason McKinney Blake Lit tle Mat t Efird George Goshgarian Aldo Sansoni

Louis Bandoni David P. Souza James Ohki Jason Chandler Dan Smith Dan Mendenhall Robert J. Weimer

Rick Alvernaz Gary Marchy Nick Blom Charles Crivelli III Steve Vilas Bill Brush

Lisa Marroquin Kent Stenderup Clinton Shick

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NEWS IN A NUTSHELL

Blue Diamond Well Represented at CalChamber Reception

Warren Cohen, Dale Tipple, and Chris Cummings had the opportunity to visit with both the California Lieutenant Governor, Eleni Kounalakis and Koji Tomita, Ambassador of Japan to the United States at the CalChamber reception in late March. We appreciate you all representing Blue Diamond so well!

L to R: Chris Cummings (Sales Director, Global Ingredient International), Warren Cohen (VP Sales, Ingredients), Koji Tomita (Ambassador of Japan to the U.S.), and Dale Tipple (Vice President and Managing Director, International Consumer)

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A L M O N D F A C T S

NEWS IN A NUTSHELL

USDA Trade Mission

While on the USDA Trade Mission to UAE, Blue Diamond visited Lulu, a large supermarket chain in the Middle East. They were promoting products from California.

FARMER PROVEN SINCE 1938.

Left to right is Karen Ross – Sec. of Calif. Dept. of Food & Ag, Daniel Whitley – Administrator of FAS∕USDA, Meghan Gregonis – U.S. Consul General for Dubai, and USDA mascot for U.S. promotions in the UAE.

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A L M O N D F A C T S

Blue Diamond Growers does not endorse or verify statements made by advertisers within this publication.

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NEWS IN A NUTSHELL

#WeAreBlueDiamond Social Media Activity

This month, Blue Diamond celebrated some of the non-profits we support through our Community Giving program. We heard some educational bits from some of you, our growers in our “Buzz on Bloom” series. Many of our growers and team members partook in “Shamrock’n” a sponsored walk/run held in Sacramento whose proceeds support cancer survivors. BDG leaders extended a big “thank you” to team members for Employee Appreciation Day.

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A L M O N D F A C T S

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NEWS IN A NUTSHELL

Creamy Lemon Spring Vegetable Pasta Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes Difficulty: Medium Servings: 5

Ingredients • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 1 small shallot minced • 1 2 asparagus spears cut into 1-inch pieces woody ends discarded • 1 (14 oz) can quartered artichoke hearts drained • 3 cups fresh spinach leaves • 3 cloves garlic minced • 3/4 cup frozen peas • 8 ounces whole wheat farfalle pasta or pasta of your choice (gluten-free is fine) • 2 tablespoons butter or vegan butter • 2 tablespoons flour (can use gluten-free flour) • 2 cups Almond Breeze Almondmilk

Directions 1. I n a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the shallot, asparagus pieces, artichoke hearts, spinach, garlic, and frozen peas. Cook until vegetables are tender and spinach is wilted, about 5 minutes. Pour the vegetables into a large bowl and set aside while you cook the pasta and sauce. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and salt generously. Cook pasta according to package instructions. 2. While the pasta is cooking, make the creamy lemon sauce. Place the large skillet you used to cook the vegetables back on the stove and melt the butter. Whisk in the flour, whisking until you don’t have any clumps. Slowly whisk in the almondmilk, about 1/2 cup at a time, whisking vigorously. Add the lemon zest and keep whisking until the sauce comes to a boil. Reduce heat to low and whisk occasionally until the sauce thickens. Add in the lemon juice and sliced lemons. Season the sauce with salt and black pepper, to taste. 3. Drain the pasta and add it to the thickened lemon sauce. Stir in the cooked vegetables and stir until the pasta and vegetables are well coated with the creamy lemon sauce. Remove the lemon slices with tongs or a spoon. Garnish with fresh basil and Parmesan cheese, vegan Parmesan cheese, or nutritional yeast, if using. Serve warm.

Original Unsweetened • Z est of 1 large lemon • J uice of 1 large lemon • 4 lemon slices

• S alt and pepper to taste • ¼ cup chopped fresh basil • P armesan cheese, vegan Parmesan cheese, or nutritional yeast for garnish

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A L M O N D F A C T S

Gluten-free Strawberry Shortcakes Prep Time: 32 minutes Cook Time: 32 minutes Difficulty: Easy Servings: 4

Ingredients • 2 cups Blue Diamond Almond Flour

Directions 1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment. 2. Combine flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, salt and baking powder in a bowl. Add butter and cut in using 2 knives or a pastry blender until the butter is pea-sized. Add egg and egg white to flour mixture and stir with a fork just until combined. Stir in ice water, 1 teaspoon at a time, just until dough forms. 3. Turn dough onto prepared baking sheet and pat into an 8” disk. Sprinkle the top with 1 tablespoon sugar; press lightly. Bake at 350°F for 12 minutes or until set in the middle and browned on the edges. Transfer on parchment from baking sheet to a wire rack. Cool to room temperature. 4. Combine strawberries and the remaining tablespoon sugar in a bowl; let stand 15 minutes. Slice shortcake into 8 wedges. Top each with whipped cream and strawberries. Layer with second piece of shortbread and top with more cream and berries. Serve immediately.

• 3 tablespoons sugar, divided •  teaspoon baking powder • 1/8 teaspoon salt • 6 tablespoons cold butter, cubed • 1 egg, lightly beaten • 1 egg white, lightly beaten • 1 tablespoon ice water • 1 quart strawberries, sliced • 1 cup heavy cream, whipped

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CORNERING THE MARKET

Coming Soon: Elote & Korean BBQ Flavored Almonds!

Blue Diamond is thrilled to launch two exciting new flavors to the snack nut family: Elote and Korean BBQ! Both flavors can be found on the shelves of Walmart this May, then will become available in other stores shortly after.

Elote, (pr. eh-LO-tay) Spanish for “corn cob,” is a Mexican dish where corn on the cob is grilled, brushed in a mayonnaise cream sauce and topped with chili powder, cheese, and lime. It is often sold from food carts in Mexico and is a favorite treat in the Hispanic community. While we are always working to delight the taste buds of all generations and communities, we’re especially excited about the release of Elote because the awareness of this trending flavor is highest amongst the Hispanic community, Millennials, and Generation Z. 45% of U.S. consumers want more Mexican and Latin flavors made available in their favorite snacks. Savory Snacking Flavors Global Survey – U.S. Source: McCormick; 2022

The idea for the Elote flavor came from the creative mind of Dionisius Gunadi, a Blue Diamond intern who serves on the Innovation team with Jennifer Eastman and Amrita Mann. After he came up with the idea, he worked with our seasoning vendors to create the seasoning. He then seasoned the almonds in the lab and led sensory evaluations to come up with the best flavors to move forward. Dionisius is also a current UC Davis student, and we are grateful for his amazing work on developing this delicious flavor. Korean style barbecue (also known as gogi gui) is a method of grilling meats on a grill that is inlaid right into the dining table. The meat could be marinated in either a sweet or savory sauce and is cooked in front of customers on the table grill. And since “65% of consumers are interested in trying new cultural foods at home” (Study Finds Source: OnePoll; 2020), we’re proud to say that Korean BBQ boasts a fantastic, flavorful kick of smoky, sweet, and spicy. Along with that, Korean BBQ’s popularity is spiking as it is now one of the top ten flavors consumers crave. NEW!

EW!

Global New Products Database Source: Mintel; 2022 Elote flavored new product launches increased 66% from 2020 to 2021 within the U.S. 66% Elote flavored new product launches increased 66% from 2020 to 2021 within the U.S. 66% 6 OZ Can Awareness is highest among Hispanic consumers, Gen Z, and Millennials. Nation's Restaurant News Source: Dataessential; 2020 Once known as a comfort food, Elote is quickly growing into a well-known flavor. AdAge Source: Dataessential; 2021 Global New Products Database Source: Mintel; 2022

W!

Korean BBQ is among the top 10 foods that consumers are craving! 10

NEW!

Clemens Food Service Group Source: Dataessential; 2021

Consumers love the balance of sweetness, salt, spices, and smoke, and are actively looking for interesting ethnic-inspired snacks.

American consumers are demanding more international variety when it comes to their snacks and Korean flavors are becoming even more mainstream. Food Trends For 2021: Korean Flavors Go Mainstream Source: Forbes; 2020

Korean BBQ is among the top 10 foods that consumers are craving! 10

Seeing The World Through Flavor Source: Food Business News; 2022

Clemens Food Service Group Source: Dataessential; 2021

6 OZ Can

UPC AND SPEC I F I CAT I ONS Consumers love the balance of sweetness, salt, spices, and smoke, and are actively looking for interesting ethnic-inspired snacks. Seeing The World Through Flavor Source: Food Business News; 2022

American consumers are demanding more international variety when it comes to their snacks and Korean flavors are becoming even more mainstream. Food Trends For 2021: Korean Flavors Go Mainstream Source: Forbes; 2020

PC AND PEC I F I CAT I ONS

Once known as a comfort food, Elote is quickly growing into a well-known flavor.

Awareness is highest among Hispanic consumers, Gen Z, and Millennials.

AdAge Source: Dataessential; 2021

Nation's Restaurant News Source: Dataessential; 2020

Gross WT (lbs)

Gross WT (lbs)

Product Description

Pack Size

Case Dimension l x w x h ( in)

Unit Dimension l x w x h ( in)

NT WT (lbs)

CS Per PLT

GTIN EAN/ UCC-14 (case pack code)

TI HI

CS Per TRKLD

CS CU. FT

Product Description

Pack Size

Case Dimension l x w x h ( in)

Item Code

UPC Bar Code

Unit Dimension l x w x h ( in)

NT WT (lbs)

CS Per PLT

GTIN EAN/ UCC-14 (case pack code)

TI HI

e

6 OZ Can

6 OZ Can

570 14707 8 100 41570 14707 5 Elote AND C I F I CAT I ONS

12-6 oz 14.3 x 10.68 x 2.81 3.50 x 3.50 x 2.50 4.50 5.84 11 15 165 6,930 0.25

14360 0 41570 14360 5 100 41570 14360 2 Korean BBQ

12-6 oz 14.3 x 10.68 x 2.81 3.50 x 3.50 x 2.50 4.50 5.84 11 15 165

UPC AND SPEC I F I CAT I ONS

Gross WT (lbs)

Product Description

Pack Size

Case Dimension l x w x h ( in)

Item Code

UPC Bar Code

Unit Dimension l x w x h ( in)

NT WT (lbs)

CS Per PLT

GTIN EAN/ UCC-14 (case pack code)

TI HI

CS Per TRKLD

CS CU. FT

Gross WT (lbs)

Product Description

Pack Size

Case Dimension l x w x h ( in)

Unit Dimension l x w x h ( in)

NT WT (lbs)

CS Per PLT

GTIN EAN/ UCC-14 (case pack code)

TI HI

CS Per TRKLD

CS CU. FT

14360 0 41570 14360 5 100 41570 14360 2 Korean BBQ

12-6 oz 14.3 x 10.68 x 2.81 3.50 x 3.50 x 2.50 4.50 5.84 11 15 165 6,930 0.25

4707 8 100 41570 14707 5 Elote

12-6 oz 14.3 x 10.68 x 2.81 3.50 x 3.50 x 2.50 4.50 5.84 11 15 165 6,930 0.25

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A L M O N D F A C T S

NEW!

Launching May2022

IntroducingElote! A WORLD OF FLAVOR IN EVERY CRUNCH.

of U.S. consumers want more Mexican & Latin flavors made available in their favorite snacks. 45%

Intense

Smart

Snacking!

Taste!

O

FLAVORED FLAVORED Korean BBQ n B Q C N -S

Savory Snacking Flavors Global Survey - U.S. Source: McCormick; 2022

NET WT 6 OZ (170g)

31% of U.S. consumers regularly eat Latin-inspired cuisines.

Diversifying consumer palates are driving snack innovation, and globally inspired flavor profiles and ingredients are trending.

Spicy and sweet heat inspired global cuisines are growing in popularity.

Trending Flavors & Ingredients Source: T. Hasegawa Flavor Flash; 2022

Global Flavors Drive Snacking Trends Source: Food Business News; 2021

Food Trends & Flavor Fads for 2022 Source: SideChef; 2021

Launching May2022

NEW!

INTRODUCING KOREAN BBQ! A KOREAN KICK OF SMOKY, SWEET & SPICY.

65%

Intense

Smart

Snacking!

Taste!

of consumers are interested in trying new cultural foods at home.

Study Finds Source: OnePoll; 2020

FLAVORED Korean BBQ

NET WT 6 OZ (170g)

Flavor is the most important factor when choosing a snack, and nearly half of consumers like to experiment with new snack flavors. Trending Flavors & Ingredients in Snacks - U.S. Source: Mintel; 2020

One in every seven new products developed around the world is BBQ-focused.

38% of consumers want more Global BBQ flavors made available in their favorite snacks.

NPD Growth Curve Report Source: Innova Market Insights; 2021

Savory Snacking Flavors Global Survey - U.S. Source: McCormick; 2022

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GROWING THE GOODNESS

Sponsorship Opportunities Available (Due by April 29th): Supreme Sponsor $3,500 (1 available) — includes 8 golfers (2 teams), the option to have a Blue Diamond golf pro on one team, 3 hole sponsor signs, dedicated logo banner at event and in Almond Facts Magazine, social media posts, 20 raffle tickets, 16 drink tickets, 8 mulligans Nonpareil Sponsor $1,750 — includes 4 golfers (1 team), 1 hole sponsor sign, logo at event and in Almond Facts Magazine, 10 raffle tickets, 8 drink tickets, 4 mulligans Carmel Sponsor $1,250 — includes 4 golfers (1 team), 4 raffle tickets, 4 mulligans Pollinizer Sponsor $500 — includes 2 golfers Hole Sponsor — $250 per hole, or $600 for 3 holes Raffle Sponsorships available

Golf cart, breakfast burritos, and lunch are provided for golfers

Contact Justin Elam for availability and registration Phone: 209.303.7306 | Email: jelam@bdgrowers.com

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A L M O N D F A C T S

KC Stone had 38 growers in attendance at an Orchard Stewardship Incentive Program (OSIP) Workshop in George Te Velde’s Barn in Escalon.

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GROWING THE GOODNESS

St. Patrick’s Day Half Marathon, Shamrock’n, Returns to Sacramento! After a two-year break due to the pandemic, Blue Diamond was deeply proud to, once again, act as the sponsor of Shamrock’n Half Marathon event. Dozens of Blue Diamond team members, growers, field staff, and friends of Blue Diamond gathered on March 12 and 13 to either run the race, hand out almonds, or cheer on the runners as they passed through “ Blue Diamond Alley,” the stretch of the run that leads them through the streets of our Sacramento site. All proceeds from the run went to support Triumph Cancer Foundation, a nonprofit that assists cancer survivors in reclaiming their health through physical fitness. Thank you to all who volunteered. Even Dinger, the Sacramento River Cats mascot, stopped by to grab some almonds! We hope you enjoy some highlights from the event and seeing how much fun everyone had, all for a great cause.

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A L M O N D F A C T S

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M A R C H – A P R I L 2 0 2 2

ADVOCACY REPORT

Advocacy Report from Almond Alliance

Long before the invasion of Ukraine, the agricultural community of the United States had been bearing the burden of a broken supply chain.

The consumer and many in the agricultural community know full well how long itʼs taking to export and receive certain orders. For many, the tracking number for their package is traced to a dot floating in the Pacific. One of the most significant economic impacts on American farmers, small businesses, truckers, and Americas economic standing globally is our export crisis. A recent survey of agricultural exporters by the national Ag Trade Coalition found that lost sales ranged from $120,000 for the smallest company, up to as much as $65 million, and 85% said sales were lost as a result of not being able to deliver within the contracted time frame. To name a few, citrus, pork, dairy, rice, and almonds have experienced tremendous disruption and loss. The University of California, Davis, found that California agriculture lost $2.1 billion in export in five months in 2021.

provider’s chassis, or they cannot pick up a shipment or move an empty. Truckers constantly must go back and forth to switch chassis to pick up a load or an empty container, artificially contributing to the already short supply of chassis. • Gross Vehicle Weights restrictions vary from state to state, particularly coming into port in California. These rules create massive inefficiencies, as trucks inbound from out of state with heavier loads must stop and break down the load onto smaller trucks to meet Californias truck weight standards. Although increased to 88,000 pounds from 80,000 by Governor Gavin Newsom, it’s still limiting the movement of product and increasing freight costs compared to the Pacific Northwest, where truck weights of 105,500 pounds are allowed. Combined with a trucker shortage of about 90,000, were again undersized and out-of-date. • The White House reported that detention and demurrage fees had increased 50% over just one financial quarter to $2.2 billion. State and Federal Legislators continue scrambling to figure out what can be done. With funding from the USDA and partnership from CDFA, the Port of Oakland, the nation’s largest agricultural export port, is working to alleviate the congestion and entice ocean carriers to return service. For example, the Port of Oakland has set up a 25-acre empty yard where containers are made available for rapid access by exporters. In Congress, the bipartisan Ocean Shipping Reform Act carried by Rep. Garamendi and Rep. Johnson passed the House, and with the help of Sen. Klobuchar and Sen. Thune, it is working its way through the Senate.

The export crisis stems from a series of contributing factors:

• Undersized and outdated infrastructure unable to keep up with the COVID spike of 20% increase in imported goods. According to an October of 2021 study by the World Bank and IHS Markit , of 351 container ports around the globe, Los Angeles was ranked 328, and the port of Long Beach at 333 for efficiency and modernity. Ships that used to take 15 days to traverse the Pacific and unload, now take 50 days, making turning around with empty containers more financially attractive than taking the extra time to pick up a load of American exports. • Box Rules permit intermodal equipment providers (IEP) and ocean carriers to restrict which IEP’s equipment may be used to transport containers. A trucker must use the ocean carrierʼs designated intermodal equipment

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A L M O N D F A C T S

While the legislation is still being refined to address box rules, it also empowers the Federal Maritime Commission to hold foreign carriers accountable for refusing exports. The Ocean Shipping Reform Act would: • Prohibit ocean carriers from unreasonably declining opportunities for U.S. exports. • Promote transparency by requiring ocean common carriers to report to the FMC each quarter on total import/export tonnage and twenty-foot equivalent units (loaded/empty) per vessel that makes port in the United States. • Authorize the FMC to self-initiate investigations of ocean common carrier’s business practices and apply enforcement measures, as appropriate. • Establish new authority for the FMC to register shipping exchanges to improve the negotiation of service contracts. In the California State Legislature, Assemblymember Aguiar- Curry introduced AB 2406 to prohibit intermodal marine

equipment providers or intermodal marine terminal operators from imposing per diem, detention, demurrage, extending dwell or congestion charges under certain circumstances that are not within the control of the importer, exporter, or trucker. The ag community is not facing a supply problem or a demand problem. It’s a leadership problem. The attention provided by the state and federal administrations is appreciated, but it’s treating symptoms, not the disease. We must explore and exercise the full authority of the United States and the State of California to find whatever recourse or incentive available to hold carriers to contracts. The California farmer is heading into what might be the most expensive year of farming in their lifetime. The cost of water is on the rise heading into the third year of reduced water allocations and drought. The fuel cost is equally increasing, the irregularity and increased cost of critical fertilizer and plant health products are exacerbated by the war in Ukraine.

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ADVOCACY REPORT

On any product sold but not delivered, payments were never received. The 2022 cash flow is tight, and still, the trees continue to grow, and the 2022 crop will be harvested soon. American farmers, workers, small businesses, truckers, and everyone along the way can’t continue this way forever.

As an ag community, we are headed into tough times. So much of the supply chain crisis seems out of our control. Still, the American ag community is resilient, sophisticated, and adaptable. While we continue to call for leadership to defend the American worker, farmer, small business, and position in the world, it is apparent we cannot leave this up to the government alone to solve. Like everything else on the farm, were going to have to solve this problem for ourselves. At the Almond Alliance, we continue to be a resounding voice in Washington and Sacramento, elevating the reality of the crisis and advocating for real solutions, not just temporary relief. We continue to work with our partners and our members on the ground to explore, identify, and create workable options and find technical and financial resources to keep our farmers farming.

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Almond Alliance

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L I FE SCI ENCE S

CULTIVATING SUSTAINABILITY

SUSTAINABLY SPEAKING, WITH DR. DAN

Why Sustainability at Blue Diamond ? Sales. For quite a while now, Blue Diamond has been explaining to members that our efforts at creating a sustainability program are driven by our customers. We’ve explained that the number of big customers asking pointed questions about our sustainability efforts has been increasing each year. Yet, I know that some members equate sustainability with a brand of politics and suspect that instead of selling almonds, we’re “selling out.” I wanted to use this column to assure members that far from “selling out,” we’re absolutely focused on sales for their benefit when we create sustainability programs.

From 2013–2018 sales data showed that while the share of market for sustainably marketed products was less than 17%, these products were responsible for 50% of all market growth during the same period. But for many customers, sustainability is a positive sales opportunity. I’ve been following research on consumer interest in sustainability since 2005. In the early days of tracking consumer interest, it was clear that a subset of consumers in the U.S. were interested in sustainability, but most were not interested in paying extra for it. But since 2005, the Millennial generation has emerged into adulthood and even Generation Z behind them is entering the workforce. These generations have altered the narrative. A majority of consumers now say they are interested in sustainability, not a subset. The younger generations, in particular, seek out brands built entirely around sustainability and are willing to pay extra for these brands. The perception is that they are thereby investing in health, the environment, and community development, though one could also argue that they are investing in status symbols. Either way, from 2013-2018 sales data showed that while the share of market for sustainably

I’ve been at Blue Diamond for nearly 11 months as of writing this article. In that time, the number of requests from customers, our sales partners, or our sales staff for sustainability data or presentation materials has been running about a rate of one every 10 days. And the rate is accelerating. Sometimes it takes multiple days to complete the data request from a customer, while others are more quickly completed. Why are these customers putting effort into this ? For some customers, the process is defensive — they don’t want to be sourcing from suppliers that may give them a “black eye” if a story hits the news about environmental abuses. That could negatively impact their sales by turning consumers away from purchasing. Some customers are motivated by climate change and related concerns that one could be characterize as political.

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marketed products was less than 17%, these products were responsible for 50% of all market growth during the same period. That means the remaining 83% of products had little or no growth in sales. In early March, we met with a European partner whose market research identified sustainability as one of three large trends driving product introductions in that market. There is a lot of interest in sustainability in the marketplace. It is too big to ignore.

I think of our investment in sustainability similarly to introducing a new flavor of snack almonds. Blue Diamond launched Smokehouse ® almonds way back in 1949. I love Smokehouse ® almonds and so do many other folks. But that didn’t stop Blue Diamond from introducing Wasabi and Soy Sauce flavored almonds in 2005. Today, that flavor is almost as popular as Smokehouse ® and is a significant sales driver for our snack nuts business. I doubt there is a member who is upset that we added this bold flavor to our product portfolio instead of insisting that our consumers stick with the classics. The recent introduction of XTREMES ™ takes spicy flavors to yet another level in the pursuit of consumer dollars for our members. We are pursuing the contemporary interests of consumers as we seek to maximize returns for our members. True, flavoring nuts is not the same as engaging our members in their on-farm practices; there is more involved here. Nor are spicy flavors as politicized as sustainability issues. But the market reality is…a reality. I’ve told my colleagues at Blue Diamond that if sustainability can’t help drive sales, then I’m not doing my job. That is our focus for sustainability at Blue Diamond . Sales, not selling out.

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CULTIVATING SUSTAINABILITY

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A L M O N D F A C T S

LOOK OUT, PESTS. MINECTO PRODOESN’T MISS.

Minecto ® Pro insecticide delivers exceptional control of difficult-to-manage pests in your crops.With its premix formulation of two powerful modes of action, Minecto Pro offers extended residual control of pests including psyllids, mites, whiteflies, thrips, beetles and worms. Minecto Pro is designed to protect specialty crops including citrus, tree nuts, pome, potatoes and vegetables. When you have difficult-to-control pests in your crops, make sure your insecticide doesn’t miss.

To learn how Minecto Pro can help protect your crops from pests, visit SyngentaUS.com/MinectoPro

©2022 Syngenta. Important: Always read and follow label instructions. Some products may not be registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Please check with your local extension service to ensure registration status. Minecto Pro is a Restricted Use Pesticide. Minecto Pro is highly toxic to bees exposed to direct treatment on blooming crops and weeds. Do not apply this product or allow it to drift onto blooming plants while bees are foraging adjacent to the treatment area. Minecto ® , the Alliance Frame, the Purpose Icon and the Syngenta logo are trademarks of a Syngenta Group Company. MW 9MNP00577-DART-AG246 02/22

IN YOUR ORCHARD

GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN

Blue Diamond Moving Despite Challenges Over the last two years, ports and transportation have continued to face congestion and delays globally, leading to many almond exporters facing the difficult task of processing and shipping their crops. The rolling delays of shipments, equipment availability to load, chassis available to move containers, and ongoing driver shortages have led to warehousing capacity reaching all-time highs. Several factors have contributed to the delays that continue to place pressure on Global Logistics:

• In 2020, increased consumer spending and a labor shortage at ports and driver shortage created a backlog of cargo awaiting shipment. • The Alliance, a group of steamships exiting the Port of Oakland, and the entry of new ocean carriers with larger ships have resulted in fewer options for export. • Ocean carriers significantly reduced or canceled volume commitments to all exporters to reduce the volume on ships. • Ocean carriers continue to focus on profit by returning empties to more profitable regions for reloading and import back. For example, in January of this year, empty containers were moved back to Asia by the steamships off the West Coast, causing further constraints and availability challenges. • Chassis availability has reached capacity as delays in shipping and unloading have reached capacity, leading to a lack of wheels to move containers once loaded for truckers. The delays in shipments, securing vessel space, and warehouse networks reaching all-time highs have resulted in charges with detention on what is already in some cases a 200% – 300% increase in transportation rates over prior years. In addition, many exporters have faced challenges securing vessel shipments regardless of being willing to pay the prices. Lastly, carrier systems automatically generate

penalties requiring many hours of research to file claims. These financial burdens have weighted many handlers and growers with increasing logistics costs in times of high fuel prices. The power of Blue Diamond Growers has never been more present than amid these dynamic and challenging times. Like others in the industry, we have faced challenges such as delays, administratively burdensome booking processes, and increased rates. The strength of the cooperative has helped us to implement new processes to improve our performance and distribute our growers’ almonds globally: • Booking ahead has allowed us to remain ahead and move our containers when others have not located container space on ships or equipment to load out. • Having a trusted partner in Devine Intermodal, who has been a carrier for Blue Diamond Growers for over 30 years, is integrated into our trucking operations and secures our equipment. • Our direct contractual relationships with our Ocean Carriers and access to the global support desk provide a competitive advantage. • Forward-thinking with capital for our California Network infrastructure with warehouses in Salida, Sacramento, Oakdale, and our dedicated third-party warehouse allows us to support shipment delays without disrupting our supply chain.

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While we face many challenges in the coming year, your Blue Diamond team continues to find new and innovative ways to move our shipments. Our shipments have experienced delays of weeks, but ultimately, we are shipping out on vessels. Our California network allows us to hold, book, and secure capacity, while adjusting for the changes seen daily. Finally, our Global Supply Chain and Operations team has been hard at work to ensure we deliver the benefits of Blue Diamond almonds globally.

Steve Schult, VP Global Supply Chain, Blue Diamond Growers

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IN YOUR ORCHARD

TIME TO CONSIDER

Orchard Care This Spring I saw bacterial blast-like symptoms on Independence blossoms in March, as well as bacterial canker-like symptoms on trees. They may have had an incompatibility issue between the Independence scion and Krymsk rootstock. Bacterial canker, blossom, and bud blast are all caused by a plant-pathogenic bacterium called Pseudomondas syringae pv. syringae that is usually found living on the surface of healthy plants. Pseudomondas syringae lives most of the time as an “omnipresent epiphyte,” always present on the surface of plants, living happily, just waiting for certain environmental conditions (cold and wet) that allow it to enter the plant, multiply, and build to high enough populations within the tree to trigger a disease (bacterial blast or canker). Relatively little is known about blossom and leaf bacterial blast, but we do know that cold wet weather can be important predisposing factors that can worsen the disease. The picture of “blasted” blossoms are from trees growing in sandy soils in an orchard near Manteca. We had some cold temperatures in late February early March that could have created small wounds that allowed the bacteria to enter leaves and blossoms. Bacterial blast is usually more severe in the lower canopy of the tree and in the lower part of an orchard. Blast is usually more severe on earlier blooming varieties, but that may be because earlier blooming varieties tend to be in bloom when temperatures are cooler. Aldrich and Fritz are typically less affected than Nonpareil, Independence, or Carmel. Bacterial blossom blast has been significantly reduced in trials where trees were protected against frost by running water or wind machines. Harley English, a UC Davis professor in the 1980s, conducted a series of experiments on bacterial blossom blast. Cut blossoming shoots of almond that were subjected to 24.8°F (-4°C) for two hours were significantly more susceptible to blast than shoots that were not subjected to the two-hour frost treatment. In another

Bacterial Blast

Bacterial Canker

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