Seasons Ontario Magazine

MAGAZINE

The Evolution of Retirement Living The difference between a Seniors Home and a Retirement Residence.

A s you begin your search for senior living options you might wonder, what is the difference between a ‘Seniors Home’ and a ‘Retirement Residence’? Simply put, the difference is just wording. A retirement residence is typically an independent living community that offers care, meals, housekeeping services and activities. This should not be confused with a Long Term Care (LTC) residence, which caters to people with the highest care needs. Retirement residences are often, but not always, private pay operations while an LTC residence in Ontario is subsidized by the provincial government. Essentially, a ‘seniors home’ is a passé term for one or both of these options. It conjures up visions of elderly residents, sleeping in rocking chairs with terrible food to eat and not much to do. As a whole, the retirement community industry is shifting from offering places of care and rest to places of activity and vitality.

Seasons is an example of this evolution. Monthly activity calendars cater to the interests of the community, offering something for everyone. Visit at lunchtime and you will feel the buzz of anticipation as residents greet their neighbours and friends for a meal prepared by an executive chef. Wii bowling tournaments are commonplace with winners enjoying bragging rights for days, and pub nights are a must- do, with local entertainers adding to the upbeat atmosphere. The impact of this change is important. More physical and mental activity, as well as more social interaction, means seniors can live longer and healthier. Balanced meals offer a variety of healthy choices but don’t skimp on presentation and taste. Seniors today want to know that professionally trained staff can provide care when needed, but this isn’t their only priority: they also demand a comfortable lifestyle, allowing them to truly enjoy their retirement. Seasons strives to accomplish this by being a place our residents are proud to call home.

More physical and mental activity, as well as more social interaction, means seniors can live longer and healthier.

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Seasons Retirement Communities

Care Services Seasons believes in a flexible approach to care.

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Cost of Living Comparison

Content

Consider this infographic and compare the costs to your monthly household expenses.

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33 Living the Fun Life

The Importance of Giving Back 40

15 Dining Services Food plays a major role in how a resident feels about living in a retirement community. Meeting Residents’ Needs Now and in the Future 22 What happens when care needs change?

How Sweet it is with Celebrity Chefs, Anna & Michael Olson

The social aspect and enjoyment of being with others creates a warm, positive energy between residents and staff.

Kickin’ It Up! at Seasons: Seasons’ signature program to encourage residents to move more. Remarkable Resident Spotlight: Seasons Remarkable Resident 2019, Ruth Anne Rhea. Sysco - From the Ground Up: Fresh food and fresh ideas are at the heart of food and service. Decluttering & Downsizing: Invaluable tips and information for a healthy downsizing transition.

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24 Memory Care the Seasons Way It takes special qualities and strengths to serve seniors with cognitive impairments.

Care Definitions

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Why I Love My Job

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Evolution of Retirement Living 1 The Signs of Change 4 It’s Time for A Talk 6 Resources 9 The Way Home Feels 10 Michael Olson Recipe 18

Medication Management 29 Love Notes from Our Residents 31 Pet Friendliness 37 Driving Safety 39 Safety & Security at Seasons 43

Frequently Asked Questions

Seasons Locations Mission, Vision, Values

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Seasons Retirement Communities

The Signs of Change When is the right time to move to a retirement residence? T here is no magic age or time in someone’s life: Everyone is different and people have different needs and wants for their retirement.

1) Kitchen Check the fridge for spoiled food, or evidence of fresh food from a recent trip to the grocery store. Is your loved one living on tea and frozen or processed food? 2) Washroom Has your loved one stopped bathing? Did they once take pride in their appearance, and now it seems they don’t care? Take a look around. If there are spills on the floor it could mean your loved one isn’t reaching the bathroom in time. 3) Bedroom Do you have concerns about correct medication use? Have pills been left in the blister pack or are medications laying on the floor? 5) Dining Room If there are bills and newspapers making the house look cluttered, it could mean your loved one is having trouble keeping up with the housework. 6) Stairs Does your loved one stick to one floor of the house? This could be because they feel they can’t manage the stairs, or they could be afraid of falling. 7) Laundry Room Is the laundry piling up? Does your loved one complain that she doesn’t have any clean clothes? Household chores are tiresome and washing machines in the basement can be tough to access. 4) Living Room Aside from watching TV, how else is your loved one staying busy?

> If you live alone, do you feel unsafe or lonely? A move to Seasons means you don’t have to worry about cooking meals, cleaning and taking care of a house, or figuring out how to get to the grocery store or a doctor’s appointment: we take care of all of that. Making this decision sooner in life means more time spent enjoying yourself and less time worrying. You deserve it! Concerned about a loved one? There are some common signals that your loved one may be struggling to live at home alone. Changes in physical appearance and mood, as well as changes in their surroundings, are indicators that they might need assistance. For example, perhaps your mom used to visit with friends each week, or volunteer regularly, but now she doesn’t want to go out. Maybe your dad used to take pride in his home but now you’re seeing signs of disrepair. Take a look at this infographic and ask yourself some of these questions the next time you pay your loved one a visit. If you notice any of these or other changes in your loved one’s routine, Seasons can help!

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At Seasons, we often hear “I wish I had made this decision sooner!” Many times, people wait for a crisis before they start looking into retirement living. Maybe it was a fall or a health issue that has prompted them – or their loved ones – to begin seriously considering a retirement home. This is a natural response and we are prepared to help people with this decision at any stage in life. However, we encourage people to start thinking about Seasons before an issue arises. When you are well, you have the luxury of time on your side. You can visit the different retirement communities in your area and weigh your many options. At Seasons, you are welcome to enjoy a meal and attend any number of events to really get a sense of what we offer, who your neighbours will be and how much our service team genuinely cares about your well-being. If you are still unsure as to whether it’s time to think about retirement living, you might ask yourself these questions: > Are you eating three nutritious meals a day? > Is it getting harder to keep up with cleaning and maintaining your home? > Do you still drive and if not, how easy is it for you to arrange transportation?

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8) Yard Are the gardens and lawn looking as good as they once did? Yard work is strenuous. Your loved one might need a helping hand to keep the yard looking neat.

9) Garage Has your loved one lost his or her driver’s licence? This can limit their independence, as they will need to depend on others to run errands, get to appointments and visit with friends and family.

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Seasons Retirement Communities

Seasons Retirement Communities

M aking the move to a requires a serious conversation with a loved one, which can sometimes be intimidating and emotional. It is important to have this discussion before a crisis occurs, such as a serious health event. Instead of having time on your side, the decision becomes required rather than desired. This prompts the question, “When is the right time to move to a retirement community?” Of course, there is no one size fits all answer, and what may work for one family may not be right for another. If you have asked yourself this question and still remain unsure, you may find that looking at The Signs of Change helpful. “These indicators really do highlight important factors that should be paid attention to. They can mean that a loved one’s lifestyle is shrinking. Maybe, they’re no longer taking part in activities they once enjoyed, eating regularly, or leaving the house much. Usually, these are silent but strong signals that now may be the right time,” says Maribeth Gregor, Senior Conversation starters when discussing retirement living. retirement living community is a big decision. It often It’s Time For a Talk

tasks. Burnout occurs when primary caregivers don’t get the help they need, or they try to do more than they can handle, which can result in feelings of increased fatigue, anxiety and depression. Some may also experience feelings of guilt when they spend time on themselves rather than spending all of their time taking care of a loved one. Symptoms: > Withdrawal from friends and family > Loss of interest in previously enjoyed activities > Feeling blue, irritable, hopeless, and helpless

for the safety of the person receiving the care or for the caregiver’s well- being. Many people who are struggling to manage these tasks still work full-time jobs, with busy schedules and families of their own. There should be no shame or feelings of guilt in seeking out and accepting help if you need it. At Seasons, we’re here to help,” finishes Maribeth. If you believe you may be suffering from caregiver burnout, speak with a trusted medical professional for personalized advice.

> Changes in appetite, weight, or both > Changes in sleep patterns > Getting sick more often > Feelings of wanting to hurt yourself or the person for whom you are caring > Emotional and physical exhaustion > Excessive use of alcohol and/or sleep medications > Irritability www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/caregiver- recognizing-burnout In this situation, Maribeth adds, “The truth is; something has to give, either

Maribeth. “Patience is also important, this isn’t a transition that happens overnight, unless it’s a ‘crisis-type’ of scenario which will surely speed-up that timeline. Objections will arise, everyone says they ‘aren’t ready’, but the truth is: it’s a journey and a process to get to that final decision.” “With the initial conversation had, the first step I would take would be to just go and look into your options. Ask your parents, ‘are any of your friends living in a retirement community?’ If yes, then go visit them, see how you feel when you walk in, take a tour, enjoy a meal or attend an event. This will give you and your loved ones a better idea of what life can hold in a retirement home. They aren’t nursing homes or long-term care facilities as many imagine,” Maribeth continues. As options become informed decisions and residents move in, we hear time and time again that they wish they had made this move sooner. With the transition comes freedom from worry and a sense of relief, often a healthier and happier parent, and more time to spend simply enjoying each other’s company. Know the Signs: Caregiver Burnout Caregiver burnout is a heightened state of physical, emotional and mental exhaustion that may be accompanied by a change in attitude toward required and/or expected care

informed and willing loved one. Hopefully, both parties will be on the same page in terms of what the future holds, adding to overall peace of mind and a sense of shared understanding. That said, many wonder: How do I bring up the topic? How do I have “the talk” about alternative living arrangements with an aging parent or loved one? Maribeth suggests starting the conversation with something small such as asking them their feelings about living at home on their own: > Do they feel safe and secure, or worried and anxious when home alone? > How are they managing home maintenance, is hired help needed to cut the grass or shovel snow? > Do they have enough groceries for the week? It could be that you’re beginning to notice subtle changes in their routine, like wanting to drive less or calling more frequently. These could be conversation starters, too. Signs like these could indicate that bigger signs may be on their way, making this a good time and opportunity to sit down and have a genuine discussion. “The biggest help I find is to be open and honest. Sometimes, aging adults don’t realize the extent of the changes happening around them until they’re pointed out and discussed. They get used to functioning as they are,” says

Director of Sales at Seasons. We do our best at Seasons to encourage people to have the conversation early, even before these signs present themselves. This way, you’ll be prepared and ready to take the next steps as they come with an

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Seasons Retirement Communities

M aking the move to a retirement community is an important decision, so we encourage you to research your many options. We are always happy to answer any questions you may have; additionally, here is a list of community resources to help you make the best decision for yourself or your loved one. Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care The Ministry of Health and Long-Term is committed to providing excellent customer service, and is guided by the principles of accessibility, responsiveness, reliability, caring, and accountability. Toll Free: 1-866-532-3161 *TTY Toll Free: 1-800-387-5559 www.health.gov.on.ca/en Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) Veterans Affairs Canada deeply values the contribution that Veterans have made to the development of our nation and we honour the sacrifices they have made in the defence of freedom and the pursuit of world peace. Veterans Affairs Canada offers a wide variety of services for Veterans and their families—programs to assist you after an injury or during the transition from military to civilian life, and many other services to help you and your family throughout your life. Toll Free: 1-866-522-2122 vac.information.acc@canada.ca www.veterans.gc.ca/eng Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority (RHRA) Established in 2010, The RHRA is an independent, not-for-profit regulatory body that works to protect the interests of residents living in retirement communities in Ontario. On behalf of Resources

Cost of Living Comparison

the Ontario government, the RHRA ensures that all Ontario retirement homes are licensed and compliant with the Retirement Homes Act, 2010 (the Act). The RHRA protects the interests of residents in the following ways: > Licenses retirement homes > Routinely inspects retirement homes against the Act > Responds to resident or staff complaints > Informs the public about non- compliant retirement homes > Educates residents, retirement home operators and the public about the Act All Seasons Retirement Communities in Ontario are licensed and compliant with the Act. At Seasons, we believe the RHRA empowers current and future residents to choose a retirement community that is right for them. Toll Free: 1-855-275-7472 info@rhra.ca www.rhra.ca Ontario Retirement Communities Association (ORCA) For over 40 years, ORCA has set the standard for operational excellence

through its leadership in offering quality retirement living education to our members. ORCA represents over 92 per cent of retirement home suites in Ontario with members providing accommodations to over 55,000 seniors. ORCA provides leadership in areas of education and training and supports members to meet provincial regulations, adopt best practices and promote quality and excellence in all areas of operation. ORCA also strongly promotes and advocates on behalf of its members with government and other stakeholders and positions the sector for growth and success as an invaluable service to today’s aging population. Seasons Retirement Communities voluntary decision to become a member of ORCA is based on the value our company places on the wellbeing of our residents, staff and family members.

Average monthly household expenses are $4,792 * . These costs are all included at Seasons. T his “Cost of Living Comparison” illustrates the average monthly expenses associated with living in your own home. Seasons Retirement Communities is here to alleviate the burden of household chores, the maintenance of your own home and the associated costs. Your monthly fee at Seasons incorporates these expenses, making retirement home living more affordable than you may think.

$2,694 Accommodations

$250 Food & Dining

$642 Maintenance & Security

Toll Free: 1-888-263-5556 info@orcaretirement.com www.orcaretirement.com

$66 Social Events

*Please visit the Seasons website for sources

$180 Transportation

$960 Care

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Seasons Retirement Communities

The Way Home Feels Seasons has been inspired by companies widely recognized as leaders in customer service.

T o achieve exceptional customer service, we believe we need to be “brilliant at the basics.” We learn who our residents are as individuals, understand what is most important to them and then do whatever we can in each interaction to exceed their expectations. It could mean acknowledging a special anniversary, preparing a resident’s morning coffee just the way they like it without being asked, or incorporating a resident’s favourite pastime into our monthly activity calendar. We seek out opportunities like these to create small “wow moments” in our residents’ lives because we know how important this is to making someone feel cared for, valued and like they are at home. We believe acknowledging the accomplishments of our residents goes a long way to making someone feel respected. The annual Seasons Celebrates Remarkable Residents program is designed to highlight the remarkable lives of our residents and celebrate them. Contestants are asked to demonstrate one or a combination of the following: (a) having made significant achievements in his/ her lifetime, (b) having made important contributions to his/her community, (c) possessing a unique talent or skill, and (d) making a positive contribution to the Seasons residence where he/

she lives. Winners receive one month free rent. The stories our residents share continue to humble and amaze us. It takes a special person to continually want to go the extra mile for our residents. We recruit and hire skilled, qualified individuals who are enthusiastic about working with seniors and who demonstrate a high propensity for customer service. We train our staff in all regulatory policies and procedures, and we empower them to embrace our corporate vision to “Connect. Care. Change.” When we take the time to genuinely connect with our residents and show them that we care, we can affect positive change in their lives – and the lives of our staff members. We regularly recognize and reward our team members’ efforts to go above and beyond our service standards. We believe that engaged employees who feel respected by their employer will naturally extend the same courtesies to our residents. At Seasons, we believe it is a privilege to be working in someone’s home and we always remember to conduct ourselves as though we are our residents’ invited guests.

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Seasons Retirement Communities

Remarkable Resident Spotlight Seasons Remarkable Resident 2019, Ruth Anne Rhea.

A t Seasons, we believe it is home. One way that we do this is through the Seasons Celebrates Remarkable Residents program, designed to celebrate the outstanding achievements, contributions and talents of our residents. The contest truly embodies the Seasons vision to “Connect. Care. Change.” It has a lasting, positive impact on residents and their families whose stories are heard, and it allows our team members to learn something unique and personal about the individuals we have the pleasure to serve each day. “We choose to align this very special program with Seniors’ Month in Ontario and Seniors’ Week in Alberta as the goals of each are similar; to highlight, recognize and celebrate the seniors within our respective communities,” says Amanda White, Senior Director of Marketing and Communications at Seasons. “It really does hold a special place in my heart, similar to the many team members that take an active role in story-collecting and residents whom we get to know.” Once more, we had an overwhelming response to the entry questionnaire. The selection committee takes the time to read and discuss each submission, then has the challenging task of narrowing down three finalists. When named, the three finalists have important to connect with the people that choose to call us

their life stories filmed by Seasons. The video compilations are then posted on the corporate Facebook page, and the one with the most combined interactions is awarded the crowning title and one-month free rent. Congratulations to our winner, Ruth Anne The 2019 winner was Ruth Anne Rhea of Seasons Belle River Retirement Community. Raised with an unstoppable attitude, Ruth Anne was determined and resilient in life. After earning a teaching degree in her youth, she went back to school to complete a bachelor’s degree at the age of 47. Outside of the classroom, Ruth spent the majority of her time volunteering with VON Geranium House, an organization dedicated to the provision of compassionate care and support to individuals facing a life threatening illness. This was the same facility that cared for her, when battling her own fight against cancer. She was awarded a special honour for outstanding service after fifteen years called the Lou Holly Award. Remarkable Resident finalists, Harold & Walter The first runner up was Harold

Hansen of Seasons High River Retirement Community. Being raised on the curb of the Great Depression and coming from a modest family of farmers, Harold understood the value of hard work. While growing his farm, Harold went on to become the President of the Blackie Chamber of Commerce and the Blackie Agricultural Society in Alberta, organizing the town’s famous Fall Fair and raising funds to build the community center that still remains a pillar of the town. His children are third generation farmers and he hopes for a fourth generation in his grandchildren. The Hansens were recognized at the famous Calgary Stampede as an outstanding Albertan farm family. The second runner up was Walter Patyk of Seasons Brantford Retirement Community. A true survivor, Walter endured a harsh two years in a Siberian prison camp, before being enlisted into the Russian Army. He received medals for bravery during the Battle of Monte Cassino while being stationed in Italy. He eventually came to settle in Canada, starting a family and putting down roots in Brantford. He was reunited with his father, mother and two surviving siblings an entire eight years later, after being separated in Siberia and homeland of Poland. We sincerely thank all of our compassionate, dedicated frontline

team members who take the time to collect these inspiring stories, along with our residents’ families. We appreciate your support of the Seasons Celebrates Remarkable Residents program for another year. Past winner, Mable Gangnier, reflects on what it can mean to a resident, “I was shocked and surprised to win, but I have been eternally grateful for the experience. Being a Remarkable Resident for Seasons was, and still is, humbling and enjoyable. Most importantly, my family has this video as a legacy for all generations to come. It’s a life-lasting gift.”

Ruth Anne, Seasons Belle River 2019 Remarkable Resident Winner

To watch the 2019 finalist videos, please visit Facebook.com/SeasonsRetirement

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Seasons Retirement Communities

Your Food is Our Passion

W e know food plays a major role in how our residents feel about living at Seasons Retirement Communities—therefore, it’s important they enjoy the food we prepare for them. To achieve this, we hire passionate, talented chefs who love food just as much as our residents do. Our dining service teams know what it takes to ensure meals are healthy and well-balanced, without compromising taste and presentation. “Food not only sustains our basic survival, it connects us, it comforts us, and is usually the central focus of our celebrations. To have the honour of preparing, cooking and serving meals to our residents, the people that laid the foundations of the community I call home, this is what motivates me and fuels my passion,” says Shelley Nault, Dining Services Manager at Seasons Drayton Valley. Many people continue to believe that retirement home food is processed, boring and bland, which simply isn’t true. “There are so many seasonings, spices, herbs, and fresh ingredients readily available to brighten up flavours, even for those with dietary restrictions. We take no shortcuts: If I am cooking for others, it must be up to my standards! If I wouldn’t eat it myself, I would never expect others to,” continues Shelley. “Proper nutrition comes from whole foods, not foods that have undergone heavy processing. The least amount of preservatives and artificial ingredients the better. Our residents want homestyle meals that bring them

what the people at each Seasons community want, then we prepare it for them. Melissa shares a personal example, “Twice a year we do a quick survey with every resident and ask the following questions: What’s your favourite food? What’s your least favourite food? If you could have a meal cooked for you from any point in your life, what would it be? I take the information the residents share and build a menu that I know they will truly love with fresh ingredients and different flavours to elevate their palettes.” Throughout the day, various activities include food treats, while a 24-hour bistro with juice, coffee and tea, cookies, muffins and fruit means no one needs to go hungry between meals. We also have spaces that residents may reserve to host group events or family gatherings or special occasions. “When friends and family come to visit, quality is very important to our residents and to us. Most of them were farmers in this area, they can tell the difference between fresh and frozen. We want them raving about the food!” highlights Melissa. As you search for a retirement home for yourself or a loved one, plan a visit over lunch or dinner to get a firsthand glimpse into the dining experience. In your retirement years, you should expect to continue traditions and daily routines that you enjoy most. The dining experience should be no exception. n *meals provided vary by residence

back to when they cooked for themselves, enjoying the added benefit of not having to shop, cook or clean up afterward!” adds Melissa Sim, Dining Services Manager at Seasons Clarington. Seasons will work with residents who have special medical dietary needs such as offering portion control for diabetics, and including desserts that are sugar-free or low in sugar. Residents are encouraged to give the kitchen feedback, share favourite recipes and participate in occasional baking activities. At mealtimes*, residents are presented with lots of menu options. Breakfast features a continental option and à la carte selections. The day begins with fresh fruit, yogurt, hearty eggs and omelettes, hot oatmeal and even warm, fluffy pancakes, if one desires. Lunch includes one main entrée, with a variety of sandwich options, warm soup choices and salad bar selections. Dinner is the main meal of the day and is more restaurant style. It includes soup and salad choices an entrée, two potato choices and two vegetable choices. There are always five to seven other options to choose from such as steak, chicken or fish. Menus have a five-week rotation and reflect the seasons, with lighter fare meals offered in the summer and comfort foods cooked up in the fall. But then there are favourites that are kept year-round, such as meatloaf and roast beef dinners. We don’t create a corporate menu. We find out

BOTTOM LINE THE

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Seasons Retirement Communities

How Sweet it is, with Celebrity Chefs, Michael & Anna Olson A t Seasons, we understand how important it is to serve quality food that our residents Olson Cook at Home and most recently, Living High Off the Hog. Of the partnership with Seasons, Anna says, “It channels the spirit of my grandmother and the connection I had with her. Our bond was food. Food brings us all together. It is more

contributions to our menus supports Seasons position that retirement dining should be fresh, flavourful and simply delicious,” says Larry Bone, Director of Dining Services at Seasons. “Some people continue to think that retirement food is boring and bland. Partnering with Michael and Anna Olson helps us to change this misconception. It also gives our chefs inspiration when creating new dishes for our residents.” What’s to Come We are excited to be featuring an Olson Dinner Party each month at all of our retirement homes across Ontario and Alberta. Each menu will be planned and provided by chefs Michael and Anna, and prepared by our Dining Services Managers. The dinner night will include a savory meal, recipe provided by Michael, and a sweet treat, recipe provided by Anna, to create a special evening of culinary excitement. Upon invitation, residents will also get to read an exclusive story behind the meal choices from Michael and Anna, adding to the overall dining experience. We look forward to our partnership with the Olsons in 2020. We have a feeling it’s going to be sweeter than ever before!

love to eat. Since 2018, Seasons Retirement Communities has demonstrated this commitment by partnering with celebrity chef couple, Michael and Anna Olson. About Michael & Anna Olson Anna, Canada’s baking sweetheart, is one of the most recognizable television chefs in the country. Her positive and common sense approach in the kitchen has been displayed on the Food Network shows such as, “Bake with Anna Olson,” “Fresh with Anna Olson,” and “Sugar.” Anna’s work continues to be highlighted in magazines and her line of best-selling cookbooks. Both the Ontario Hostelry Institute and the Canadian Food & Wine Institute have recognized her for ongoing contributions to the development of Canadian food culture. Michael has been a Chef Professor at Niagara College’s Food and Wine Institute since 2001. The institute has been included in MacLean’s Magazine, Top Canadian Culinary Schools list. A compliment to Anna’s sweet desserts, Michael’s focus remains on savoury dishes. A successful cookbook author himself, Michael has been recognized for his contributions to the Canadian culinary scene and has co-authored three bestselling cookbooks: Inn On The Twenty Cookbook, Anna and Michael

important than ever to establish contentment and nutrition around mealtime. I love what working with Seasons represents in terms of bringing me back to my roots.” Michael and Anna are clearly two halves of an extraordinary chef power-couple. What truly makes them unique, aside from their skill sets, is their shared friendly and approachable attitude. Our residents love swapping baking tips with Anna during demonstrations, and Michael is always willing to share a thoughtful answer to an audience question or vice versa. These two are magic to work with! Third Time’s the Charm At Seasons, we have accomplished a great deal during our second year with the Olsons: From hosting four successful Facebook Live events, to follow-along baking classes making classic apple pies to pineapple upside-down cakes, to in-person appearances at Seasons’ festivities, like Open Houses and Family Picnics, the partnership has been widely well-received. “Michael and Anna’s continuous

To view our past Facebook Live events with Michael and Anna Olson please visit: Facebook.com/SeasonsRetirement

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Seasons Retirement Communities

ONION TART with Balsamic & Tomatoes

C ut into bites for a perfect appetizer or served as a slice for a starter course, this tart pleases everyone and might become a family favourite. Just a few ingredients baked on crisp pastry will have your guests wondering if there aren’t a bunch of secret ingredients at work here. The balsamic glazed onions have a rich, meaty aroma and the bacon, well, I mean, it’s bacon!

4. To serve, transfer the baking sheet to a cooling rack for 5 minutes, then cut the pastry into 24 pieces so that a cherry tomato half is on each piece. Pick up with your fingers to eat warm or at room temperature. Note: Puff pastry needs a hot oven to make it crisp, light and airy, so be sure to fully heat it to temperature before baking. Excerpted from Living High Off the Hog: Over 100 Recipes and Techniques to Cook Pork Perfectly by Michael Olson. Copyright © 2019 Michael Olson. Photography by Janis Nicolay. Published by Appetite by Random House ® , a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.

1. Melt the butter in a large sauté pan over medium heat, then stir in the onions. Sauté the onions until they turn a golden brown and their volume reduces by half, about 35 minutes. Add the balsamic vinegar and stir the onions with a wooden spoon to pull up the caramelized bits from the pan. Stir in the thyme, season to taste and then remove the pan from the heat and let cool at room temperature. This can be made up to a day ahead and chilled until ready to assemble. 2. Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C) and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. 3. Lay the sheet of puff pastry on the baking sheet and dock it with a fork across the surface (this prevents it from rising too much). Spread the cooled onions in an even layer over the pastry, right to the edges, and sprinkle the crumbled bacon overtop. Arrange the cherry tomato halves overtop in 4 rows of 6. Bake the tart until it is puffed and golden brown at the edges, about 30 minutes.

Makes one 10-inch tart Yields 6 servings

Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 65 minutes 1 tbsp (15 mL) butter or reserved drippings from the cooked bacon 2 yellow onions, sliced Splash balsamic vinegar 1 tsp (5 mL) chopped fresh 1 sheet (8 oz/225 g) frozen butter puff pastry, thawed in the fridge 6 slices bacon, cooked, drained and crumbled 12 cherry tomatoes, halved thyme leaves Salt and pepper

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Seasons Retirement Communities

SYSCO – From The Ground Up

Fresh food and fresh ideas are at the heart of food and service.

I n a conversation about how food is planned, prepared and delivered at Seasons Retirement Communities, it’s important to understand where our food is sourced from. Not long ago, retirement living had a reputation that food was boring and void of nutritional value. However, many retirement communities are changing perceptions by creating fresh, locally-sourced dishes. You’re probably wondering where Seasons gets its food from and how our dining services teams manage to feed hundreds of residents three meals per day, 365 days of the year, all while keeping flavour, ingredients and nutrition top of mind. It’s no secret that we don’t grow our food in the backyards of our retirement communities. To bring fresh, high quality food selections to our residences, we use Sysco, a well- known food service distributor. A food service distributor acts as the ‘middle-man’ between food manufacturers and the food service operator, in this case our Dining Services Managers at Seasons. The distributor purchases, stores, sells and delivers products, providing food service operators with access

to items from a wide variety of manufacturers. Most food service operators purchase from a range of local, specialty and broadline food service distributors on a daily or weekly basis. Sysco’s growth is home grown. As they partner with more local ranchers, growers and producers than any other distributor in the industry, it helps support local farm to table initiatives and deliver the freshest products available, regardless of location. Sysco is committed to going global while staying local. Sysco is excited about the growing local movement in support of our regional farmers, suppliers and businesses within Alberta and Ontario’s foodservice community. Although Sysco Corporation operates in over 300 locations throughout Canada, the United States, South America and Europe, it is important to note that each Sysco house conducts business as its own individual operating company. This enables

them to respond to the unique needs of our market and as such, each Sysco location has been providing local products for decades. By utilizing a five-week menu rotation that takes into consideration our residents’ food preferences and choosing not to create a corporate menu, this allows our teams to create Although some staples are enjoyed year-round, many of our meal options take advantage of Sysco’s local offerings, especially when it comes to fresh produce. Many of our residents living in both Ontario and Alberta grew their own food and therefore knew exactly where it came from. We believe this should still be the case when they come to live with us at Seasons. seasonal dishes that are both flavourful and full of nutrients.

Supporting content: Sysco – Sarah Emmerton, Regional Vice President, National Sales

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Seasons Retirement Communities

Meeting Residents’ Needs Now and in the Future. What happens when the care needs of an independent resident changes?

M oving to a retirement the home you choose can meet your loved one’s needs now, and in the future. At Seasons, we offer independent living, independent supportive living, assisted living and memory care. All residents meet with the Health & Wellness Manager before they move in. This helps us understand who our residents are, what their goals are for retirement living and how we can best meet their care needs today and in the future. All Seasons service team members are trained to look out for even the subtlest changes in our residents so we can have proactive, discreet conversations with them about their well-being. For example, if Mary enjoys meals less than she once did or if Bob is moving more slowly than he used to, they can be symptoms of new, underlying issues. These observations, as well as routine health care evaluations, help us meet our residents’ changing needs, as they happen. Here are some other services to help Seasons residents age in place: community is a big step and you want to make sure

Convenient Resources: The benefit to retirement community living is that you have quick, convenient access to resources to support your evolving healthcare needs. For example, if you notice your eyesight is becoming a problem, we can arrange for enhanced reading materials, have our house physician see you, or arrange transportation to a local optometrist. Care Support: We assist with many aspects of our residents’ physical well-being, and can customize that support to each individual. For example, if Jack has diabetes, we can help him monitor his blood sugar, order his insulin and provide appropriate meal choices. If Emma had a fall we can help with her recovery. We can arrange for a walker, escort her and act as her cheerleader, until she can physically manage on her own again. Emotional Support: Our care staff regularly meets with each resident and especially if we notice his or her needs increasing. We will have a discreet conversation with them to ease their anxieties about these changes. We find it helps to remind residents that they are not alone, then we can discuss different care options and packages.

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Seasons Retirement Communities

Seasons Retirement Communities

Memory Care the Seasons Way

on 150 team members from Ontario and Alberta. After participating, Seasons team members understood the importance of slowing down during care and offering an empathetic approach. Without it, the wrong approach can quickly become overwhelming, frightening and frustrating. Some of their feedback included statements such as: > “This has shown me a new, wonderful way of caring.” > “This will benefit my entire career, patience is very important.” > “For [people living with dementia], their frustration is their reality. I see the importance of the positive physical approach which helps initiate that connection to provide comfort and reassurance.” n

LaSalle, Milton, Amherstburg, Stoney Creek and Brantford. For Alberta residents, we offer DSL4D (Designated Supportive Living, dementia) in Camrose, High River and Olds. Since our philosophy is rooted in person-centered care, we are open to growing and expanding our Memory Care platform as emerging science and evidence-based programs emerge. For example, implementing pets into our care programming and hosting virtual reality experiences to promote understanding and compassion between residents, family members and caregivers. What’s new: In-house research on the impact of VR training on caregivers. Seasons continues to be open to and seek out partnerships in aging research with academic institutions, its students and professors across

Canada. Through this continued outreach, we look forward to gaining increased insight and knowledge within our industry—in order to embrace innovation and best serve our residents, now and in the future. What we offer these institutions, is an excellent platform for interested researchers to access willing seniors for research purposes. In addition, we hope that through these expansive efforts, we are able to contribute in continuing to bridge the gap between youth and seniors. Most recently, we embarked on building a dementia experience that could offer team members some understanding into the resident’s world by leveraging virtual reality (VR) technology. The viewpoint of the 4-minute simulation, using a 360 degree headset, was from a person living with dementia being approached to have morning care completed. We piloted this experience

Learning to Embrace Today TM

A t Seasons, our dedicated team is always looking for new ways to improve the lives of our residents. As the Canadian population ages, experts suggest that an increasing number of seniors and their families will be affected by dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. As of 2016, the Alzheimer Society of Canada reported that 564,000 are living with dementia. Within the next 15 years, this number is expected to increase to 937,000. Seasons responded to this reality by developing a person-centred Memory Care program for seniors living with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Our Memory Care areas incorporate bright, open spaces that feel like home and are comfortable for visitors. In our newer residences, we include private outdoor spaces to promote freedom of movement and to ensure nature is close by. Furthermore, we provide engaging tools that encourage conversation for families and staff to connect with residents. This “enabling of the environment” is one branch of our Embrace Today TM philosophy that promotes wellness and positive interactions for our residents living with dementia and Alzheimer’s. Stephanie Sanborn, Director of Innovation and Education, was instrumental in building the Seasons Memory Care program. “We understand the importance of hiring for heart in order to build authentic relationships with our residents and their families,” says Stephanie.

them. Life stories shape our care plans, allow us to create “Wow Moments” that truly matter, and help us empower our residents to continue building their legacy while at Seasons. Collaboration with family members and healthcare professionals allows us to: > Know and understand a resident’s life story to build daily routines around preferences > Build supportive friendships > Host ‘Living with Dementia’ support gatherings with residents, families and staff > Provide continuing education for staff and family members > Develop meaningful, individualized programs Our activity calendar for residents in Memory Care is flexible, yet progressively balanced to incorporate the elements of the mind and spirit, like brain-enhancing games, exercises and physical activity routines, and calming meditative programs to promote sleep and happiness daily. For example, our signature program ‘Fire It Up’ is based on the research that engaging both the body and the mind in one program encourages neuroplasticity in the brain. In other words, the brain’s ability to change throughout life, which could mean compensating for lost functions, or maximizing remaining functions. In Ontario, we have designated memory care areas in Bowmanville,

We believe that positive relationships among all care partners elevates person-centered care and makes it more meaningful. The Seasons Memory Care philosophy is based on authentic relationships. Each of our highly-trained service team members commits to ‘Embrace Today’ TM which means they approach the workday with a promise to do their best to make all interactions positive and meaningful, one moment at a time. Because of this, Seasons also fosters an unhurried environment, where building genuine friendships with residents and their families is prioritized over daily routine. We strive to really understand who our residents are in order to adjust our interactions and respond with whatever is needed at the time. Additionally, we work with our residents and their loved ones to create a Legacy Today journal. Through this journal, we acknowledge and celebrate moments shared together at Seasons, as well as documenting elements of a resident’s life story. When we understand someone’s past accomplishments, and interests, for example, it strengthens our connection with

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Seasons Retirement Communities

Seasons Retirement Communities

The Seasons Approach to Care

A t Seasons, we believe in a flexible approach to care: One person’s needs may be entirely different than those of his or her neighbour, and the support someone needs today may change in the future. Susie MacMaster, Senior Director of Care Services for Seasons Retirement, says, “ We can accommodate a range of care needs. We don’t take a cookie-cutter approach to care. ” New Seasons residents have their needs assessed when they move in and receive an updated assessment every six months or annually depending on the province that they live in, or as their needs change. The level of care given is tailored to meet the individual’s specific needs. Susie says, “From the assessment, the care staff will understand the level of assistance the resident needs. Sometimes that’s only meals, housekeeping, safety checks or medication management. For others, care needs can be a lot more.”

During the assessment, the resident, and/or substitute decision maker, will be asked a series of questions about the resident’s health, ability to perform activities of daily living and their risk for falls. Once the assessment is complete, staff can determine which care package a resident requires. The packages increase in cost, depending on the care that is required. Susie says, “The benefit to a bundled approach to care services is a monthly fee our residents have agreed to, and can count on. Surprises are nice, but not on your monthly statement.” Seasons is very flexible when it comes to care and we support our residents’ preferences. Susie says, “After we have determined and agreed to the care package that best reflects a resident’s particular needs, we discuss with the resident, and often their families, how they would best like that care to be delivered. It is important that our residents have input into their individual care plan,” she adds. n

BOTTOM LINE THE

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Seasons Retirement Communities

Seasons Retirement Communities

Care Definitions

A t Seasons, we believe in a flexible approach to care that supports our residents’ preferences. We will assess a resident’s needs prior to move in and then recommend the appropriate, bundled care package that best meets their individual requirements. For detailed information, we encourage you to book a personal visit. Independent Living (IL) The townhouses and independent apartments at Seasons Retirement Communities offer independent living. They are designed for seniors who can live independently but who wish to live in a community designated for seniors with access to social or recreational programming. Our one- storey townhouses and apartments are equipped with an emergency call system but no regular care services are provided. Independent Supportive Living (ISL) Independent supportive living suits an independent, active senior who does not need assistance with the activities of daily living, but who benefits from a supportive, congregate living environment. Residents in ISL receive assistance with scheduled care and typically enjoy services such as 24- hour emergency response, three meals daily, weekly housekeeping, and medication administration.

Assisted Living (AL) The assisted living program at Seasons provides supportive care to residents who need assistance with daily tasks, but who do not require the skilled care provided at a long-term care residence. Residents receive the same services as ISL, plus any additional care services that assist with the activities of daily living. Memory Care The memory care program at Seasons is specifically designed to care for seniors living with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease in a dedicated, secure area within some of our residences. Memory care community residents receive specialized, AL care services. The Seasons Embrace Today™ memory care philosophy requires a deep understanding of who our residents are, so staff may adjust their interactions and respond with whatever is needed in the moment. Each of our trained service team members commits to approach the workday with a promise to do his or her best to make all interactions positive and meaningful, one moment at a time. We believe that when we have positive, authentic relationships among all care partners, it elevates person-centered care and makes it more meaningful.

Did You Know? Having medication administered by Seasons staff and monitored by our pharmacy partner, Remedy’s RX, is convenient and can be beneficial to your overall health:

2. Yearly, or as needed, residents can meet with a Certified Geriatric Pharmacist from Remedy’s RX, to review their medications, ask questions and discuss benefits of different dispensing options, such as blister packs. 3. When the Seasons Health & Wellness team assists with medication administration, it ensures that medication is given at the correct time and correct 2 3

dosage. This contributes to less drug interactions with other medications or supplements. 4. Seasons Health & Wellness team members can oversee the effectiveness of medications or the need to change medications. By monitoring general health concerns, such as blood pressure, blood glucose, or pain levels, we can alert your physician of a need for change.

1. When medications are managed by Seasons staff, all faxes, daily deliveries, changes in doctor’s orders etc., are coordinated through the Seasons Wellness Centre for your convenience, at no additional charge. This is especially beneficial when you see multiple doctors for different health reasons. In contrast, some external pharmacies charge for delivery and sometimes they only offer limited delivery.   1

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Seasons Retirement Communities

Seasons Retirement Communities

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