SpotlightApril2021

APRIL 2021

NITRO BROS COLD BREW IT’S COFFEE; NOT ROCKET SCIENCE EPIC EATERIES & SWEETERIES BONEHEADS BBQ KICKIN’ SOUTHERN SMOKEHOUSE IN THE HEART OF HALIFAX

NAVIGATE A PANDEMIC THREE WAYS TO COPE WHEN YOUR BUSINESS IS STANDING STILL

THE F OR E S T R Y I NDUS T R Y  NOT SEEING THE FOREST FOR THE TREES

IN THE SPOTLIGHT TOMI LAHREN AUTHOR, POLITICAL COMMENTATOR, FOX NEWS CONTRIBUTOR, & THE HOST OF FOX NATION’S, NO INTERRUPTION & FINAL THOUGHTS

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APRIL 2021 • SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE

spotlight on april I n a time when it seems like everyone has an opinion on many topics, it is important to remember that it is our responsibility to look at all sides of an issue, get the facts and understand that there are going to be times that we need to agree to disagree, but that open dialogue is the only way that we are going to be able to make the world a better place to live and do business. Spotlight on Business had an open and candid conversation with Fox News contributor and host of Fox Nation’s No Interruption and Final Thoughts, Tomi Lahren. Tomi shares some life lessons she has learned on her way to being the youngest political talk show host in history, along with her fearless outlook on life, her deep passion for her country and those that serve and protect it. But more importantly why she believes that everyone needs to have a voice, especially other young women willing to speak their minds and that it is okay to agree to disagree. The media has recently taken an interest in promoting the Environmental groups side of the long-standing argument about whether forestry is bad or good. Cassie (Ledwidge) Turple, a 3rd Generation Sawmiller shares her insight on the forestry industry, to give us a better understanding the industry and its role in providing essential products we use everyday. When then follow up with Nitro Bros Cold Brew which started as an idea to cold brew coffee and serve it from a trike at events in Calgary. Kyle Shaugh- nessy and David Piotto, co-founders and owners of Nitro Bros Cold Brew explain how they continue to keep the wheels turning on the brand during the pandemic, their expansion into Kelowna along with now offering coast to coast delivery for their Nitro Cold-brew Coffee products. Shannon Ferguson from FanSaves explains how this past year has tested business owners in ways that no one could have expected. Especially small and medium sized businesses who most likely didn’t have “Navigate a Pandemic” written into their business plans and how they can come out of this time stronger than ever professionally and personally. Then we are serving up mouth watering bar-b-que for this month’s edition of Epic Eateries & Sweeteries, spotlighting Boneheads BBQ who have been offering kickin’ Southern Smokehouse in the heart of Halifax for over tens years. We also put Maui Brewing’s new Sunshine Girl Golden Ale through the taste test with another installment of From Grains to Glasses as we continue to look for candidates for this year’s Ultimate Craft Cooler project. Wewant to thank everyone that made this issue possible, andwe look forward to sharing more stories about successful businesses and brands, while spot- lighting the people behind making it all happen. Remember we are all in this together. Lee Ann Atwater Editor

MANAGING DIRECTOR Rod Gregg EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Lee Ann Atwater COMMUNICATION, RESEARCH & ADMIN LEAD Ashley Tanner

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Janice Buckler

Megan Callahan Shannon Ferguson Anita Flowers Calli Gregg Deborah Jaremko Lennie Kaplan Mark Milke Ceiledh Monk Dan Monk Brittany Pickrem Christi Rideout Elizabeth Spencer Cassie Turple

SOCIAL MEDIA LEAD Troy Gregg GRAPHIC DESIGN LEAD Aaron Jeffrey WEB DESIGN LEAD

Sean Bridge PUBLISHER AIDACA Media

P.O. Box 35007, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3M 0G3 P: 902 405 2000 E: info@spotlightbizmag.com spotlightonbusinessmagazine.com

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SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE • APRIL 2021

What’s in the Spotlight on the cover & in the spotlight

NITRO BROS COLD BREW IT’S COFFEE; NOT ROCKET SCIENCE

NAVIGATE A PANDEMIC THREE WAYS TO COPE WHEN YOUR BUSINESS IS STANDING STILL An open and candid conversation with Tomi Lahren, Fox News contributor and host of Fox Nation’s No Interruption and Final Thoughts dis- cussing everything from her childhood growing up in South Dakota to her life now in Nashville. Tomi shares some life lessons she has learned on her way to being the youngest political talk show host in history, along with her fearless outlook on life, her deep passion for her country and those that serve and protect it. But more importantly why she believes that everyone needs to have a voice, especially other young women willing to speak their minds and that it is okay to agree to disagree. TOMI LAHREN AUTHOR, POLITICAL COMMENTATOR, FOX NEWS CONTRIBUTOR, AND THE HOST OF FOX NATION’S NO INTERRUPTION & FINAL THOUGHTS

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03 SPOTLIGHT ON APRIL 08 UPCOMING EVENTS

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20 SPOTLIGHT ON INDUSTRY 22 CONTRACTORS CORNER Work-Life Balance 28 CANADA, U.S. NEED TO FIND ‘SWEET SPOT’ BALANCING ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT TOGETHER Q&A with Gary Mar, CEO of the Canada West Foundation 30 DESIGN OF THE TIMES Springing into cleaning action 34 CIRCLING THE EARTH 11 TIMES Key Facts about the Canada-US Energy Pipeline Network 46 SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS 50 NAVIGATE A PANDEMIC Three Ways to Cope When Your Business is Standing Still 66 FROM GRAINS TO GLASSES Maui Brewing’s Sunshine Girl Golden Ale 70 DRIVEN AUTOMOTIVE Keeping you safe in the driver’s seat 78 SPOTLIGHT ON INNOVATION 80 BUILDING BRANDS WITH BRITTANY Overlooked & Undervalued 85 CLEAN TECHNOLOGIES Canada’s leadership in carbon mitigation tech sparking imagination about the future 90 SPOTLIGHT ON HEALTH & WELLNESS 92 HOLISTIC HEALTH Our Second Circulatory System! 94 MOM TO THE RESCUE Don’t Iron a Graduation Gown While Crying

We followed up with Kyle Shaughnessy and David Piotto, co-founders and owners of Nitro Bros Cold Brew as they continue to keep the wheels turning on the brand during the pandemic, expanding to Kelowna and offering coast to coast delivery for their Nitro Cold-brew Coffee products.

THE FORESTRY INDUSTRY NOT SEEING THE FOREST FOR THE TREES

EPIC EATERIES & SWEETERIES BONEHEADS BBQ KICKIN’ SOUTHERN SMOKEHOUSE IN THE HEART OF HALIFAX

48 When people think of Halifax, Nova Scotia, they have images of amazing waterfront views of the harbour and feasting on some of the finest seafood the world has to offer. However, we think that one trip to Boneheads BBQ will get residents and visitors alike coming to the city craving some kickin’ southern bar-b-que at Hal- ifax’s Original Smokehouse BBQ Joint. 52

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The media has recently taken an interest in promoting the Environmental group’s side of the long-standing argument about whether forestry is bad or good. We wanted to give Cassie Turple, a 3rd Generation Sawmiller with Ledwidge Lumber Co Ltd an opportunity to share her insight on very visual Forestry industry, where the trees stand tall one day and are gone the next as part of a process to provide essential products, we use everyday.

Shannon Ferguson from FanSaves explains how this past year has tested business owners in ways that no one could have expected. Especial- ly small and medium sized businesses who most likely didn’t have “Navigate a Pandemic” written into their business plans and how they can come out of this time stronger than ever professionally and personally.

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SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE • APRIL 2021

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SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE • APRIL 2021

UPCOMING EVENTS

GSF WEST LIVE RETAILER CONNECT May 11th – 12th, 2021 Virtual Event | Online The pioneering West Live Retailer Connect event will provide even more engagement opportuni- ties complete with keynotes, workshops, product discovery and more. The showrooms can be accessed easily with one click and feature exhibitors’ curated products and services, where sales can directly take place. Sampling and digital show bags will also be made available. For more information on this event go to https://virtual.gsfshow.com/

LUCKY LEAF EXPO May 14th – 15th, 2021 Austin Convention Center | Austin, TX, USA Make your own luck in Texas at the Lucky Leaf Expo. Find out why our hemp conference is the obvious choice to place your bets. Go big and get lucky at this USA CBD expo designed to be one of the best CBD events and cannabis trade shows! Lucky Leaf Austin Hemp Convention was the first major cannabis, hemp and CBD expo in Texas of its kind after the new laws were passed. Lucky Leaf has personally seen the positive impact that cannabis and hemp havemade on people’s lives whether with their individ- ual health or professionally as they discover business opportu- nities that weren’t possible only a few years ago and witnessed the rising influence they have on local economies For more information on this event go to https://luckyleafex- po.com/

TOBACCO PLUS EXPO May 12th – 14th, 2021 Las Vegas Convention | Las Vegas, NV, USA Networking, new product releases, and exclusive show deals, you will find all this and more at the annual Tobacco Plus Expo (TPE) interna- tional trade show and convention. TPE has been named as one of “The Top 50 Fastest Growing,” tradeshows in the United States for two consecutive years, making it a great place to do serious business whether you’re a manufacturer or retailer that carries premium tobacco, CBD, vapor and other consumer products. TPE21 will be held at the Las Vegas Convention Center for 3 days of in-person business and network- ing. Connect with brand owners, retailers, wholesalers, distributors, and professionals for a can’t-miss trade show experience. For more information on this event go to https://tobaccoplusexpo. com/

THE BEVERAGE FORUM May 11th – 12th, 2021 Virtual Event | Online

THE MEDICAL SPA SHOW May 5th – 8th, 2021 Wynn Las Vegas | Las Vegas, NV, USA The Medical Spa Show is where the medical spa industry comes together and is considered the premier conference and trade show for non-surgical medical aesthetics. Industry-leading instructors keep you up-to-date on treatment trends, medical spa laws, business best-practices and the latest in medical aesthetic marketing. Experience multiple tracks of clinical, business, legal, and mar- keting education. Explore the exhibit hall to find your next great treatment, technology, or service partner. Expand your network and meet, trade notes, and share stories with hundreds of medical spa professional just like you. For more information on this event go to https://www.medical- spashow.com/

JACKSONVILLE INTERNATIONAL AUTO SHOW May 7th – 9th, 2021

Prime Osborn Convention Center | Jacksonville, FL, USA The Jacksonville Internation- al Auto Show is the premier showcase of the newest model year import and domestic vehicles — cars, vans, cross- overs, hybrids, light trucks, and sport utilities. Factory and dealer representa- tives from the car lines are on hand to answer your questions in a no pressure environment at the Auto Show. There are cars to suit every budget and lifestyle at the Auto Show. With the car lines all under one roof, it’s easy to compare prices and features, saving both time and money. The Jacksonville International Auto Show is great entertain- ment for serious shoppers and auto buffs! So come sit in the cars, pop the hoods, inspect the trunks, kick the tires. For more information on this event go to https://jaxautoshow. com/

The Beverage Forum is the only executive level conference that will bring together a broad array of beverage companies with key leaders and innovators to address the future state of the beverage marketplace. With a new kind of future ahead for all beverage pro- fessionals, now is the greatest time to keep informed on the progres- sion of the beverage community. Take your organization to a new level of success with the knowl- edge and practices of today’s leaders and tastemakers. No other beverage conference will give you direct access to the most influen - tial and forward-thinking minds in the beverage industry. For more information on this event go to https://www.bevindustry. com/beverage-forum

WANT TO HAVE YOUR EVENT IN THE SPOTLIGHT? Send an email 4 weeks in advance to production@spotlightbizmag.com with all the details of your event.

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SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE • APRIL 2021

IN THE SPOTLIGHT TOMI LAHREN AUTHOR, POLITICAL COMMENTATOR, FOX NEWS CONTRIBUTOR,

S potlight on Business Magazine had an open and candid conversation with Tomi Lahren, Fox News contributor and host of “No Interruption” and “Final Thoughts” on the digital streaming platform Fox Nation discussing everything with this small-town girl from South Dakota includ- ing her childhood to her life now in Nash- ville. Tomi shares some life lessons she has learned on her way to being the youngest political talk show host in history, along with her fearless outlook on life, her deep passion for her country and those that serve and protect it. But more importantly why Tomi believes that everyone needs to have a voice, especially other young women willing to speak their minds. She believes that everyone has a right to be heard even if we might disagree with their message and that at the end of the day it is okay to agree to disagree. Fitness and lifestyle are also important to me. I run 5 miles everyday which allows me to blow off steam and get my mind into a good groove for the day ahead. I also enjoy spending time with my little rescue chihuahua, Kota. Spotlight: You attended and graduated from University of Nevada, Las Vegas in 2014 with a B.A. in broadcast journalism and political science. When did you first become interest - ed in politics? Were either of your parents politically active when you were growing up?

AND THE HOST OF FOX NATION’S, NO INTERRUPTION AND FINAL THOUGHTS by Lee Ann Atwater S potlight: Tell us a little about yourself, what was it like growing up in South Dakota? What types of careers did your parents have? Do you have any siblings? Tomi Lahren: I wouldn’t trade my childhood or upbringing for anything in the world. I grew up in the country on about 12 acres of land. I didn’t have kids my age near where I lived so I spent most of my time by myself, with adults or outside with my animals. I grew up with every pet you can think of. We had horses, a dog, a cat, a rabbit, hamsters, all of it. I always enjoyed being out in wide open spaces. My parents both grew up on ranches and my uncle still runs the family ranch in Eastern South Dakota. Both of my parents worked and still work full time jobs. Some may say average blue-col-

lar Americans, but I don’t believe there is such a thing as an “average American.” Our blue-col- lar workers are the backbone of this country. I was raised to work hard, pray hard, and not ask for anything from anybody. South Dakotans are proud yet humble people. I am an only child and couldn’t imagine it any other way. I believe it was that independence that allowed me to excel to where I am today. I am very close with my parents who always encouraged me to go for gold and never hesitate to break the mold. Spotlight: What are your hobbies? What do you like to do in your spare time when you are not keeping the people of America informed about political ongoings?

Tomi Lahren: I’m a pretty simple gal. When I’m not working, I enjoy going out in Nashville with my friends, listening to LIVE music and checking out of politics. It’s a good weekend day when I don’t feel the need to check Twitter even once. I do an unconventional job but when I’m not on air or working, I am just like any other 28-year-old. I am in a new relationship now with a baseball TV/radio analyst. He is based in Miami, so I have been getting down there every weekend I am able.

“I’m a pretty simple gal. When I’m not working, I enjoy going out in Nashville with my friends, listening to LIVE music and checking out of politics.”

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Tomi Lahren: I have always been political and opinionated. That stems from my outspo- ken nature I was born with but was fostered by watching the nightly news with my parents. I have always cared about this country more than anything and always felt Middle America was largely ignored or lost in the shuffle. That is one of the main reasons I wanted to be in media. I have always wanted to give a voice to the forgotten Americans—those in small towns and small states that don’t get the limelight or coverage but matter just the same as those in big and urban cities. I’ve never much cared what the elites in DC, LA or NYC have to say, I want to know, understand and advocate for the things that matter to real people. Spotlight: While at the University of Nevada you hosted and associate produced the uni- versity’s political roundtable show, “The Scramble.” Is this when you realized this might be a possible career choice for you? Tomi Lahren: I have always known this was going to be my career path. I have never wanted to do anything else. The Scramble taught me how to put together a show, listen to opposing and diverse views and take a back seat when needed. I discovered my voice at a very young age and ever since then, I’ve wanted to use my ability to

“I have always wanted to give a voice to the forgotten Ameri- cans—those in small towns and small states that don’t get the limelight or coverage but matter just the same as those in big and urban cities.”

“I am a small-town girl with a fearless outlook on life and a deep passion for my country.”

explain, connect and deliver a message to the masses from a perspective that is uniquely my own. I don’t try to be something I am not, never have. I don’t try to talk over people’s heads or in terms they can’t relate to or connect with. I am a small-town girl with a fearless outlook on life and a deep passion for my country. Mix that in with my can-do attitude and my willingness to outwork most and I’ve enjoyed building a career I am very proud of. Spotlight: What was it like to intern for South Dakota Congresswoman Kristi Noem? What valuable lessons or insight did you take away from that opportunity and how have you applied that to your career?

Tomi Lahren: My internship with then Congress- woman Noem taught me more about what I did not want to do. I have little desire to be in politics. I don’t like the game of it all. That expe- rience taught me I’d rather be on the outside, in the media, serving as a watchdog and a check on power. I’ve done that throughout my career whether it be at the local level speaking out against my Nashville Mayor or on the state level exposing California Governor Gavin Newsom. Spotlight: What mentors did, or do you have now? You inspire many, but who inspires you and why?

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“I didn’t grow up with money or status, but my parents gave me something far more valuable, work ethic and grit.”

Tomi Lahren: It may sound cliché, but my mentors are my parents. I didn’t grow up with money or status, but my parents gave me some- thing far more valuable, work ethic and grit. They, and people like them, inspire me. I am motivated by the ranchers, the farmers, police officers, factory workers, border patrol and ICE agents. I am inspired by those who work hard, ask little in return and sacrifice themselves to serve their country and community with honor and dignity. The fact I can be a voice for those people means the world to me and pushes me to keep going. Spotlight: Tell us about how applying for an internship at One America News Network (OANN) changed your life? What is the biggest lesson you have learned along the way? What was your biggest surprise? What was your biggest disappointment? Tomi Lahren: My big opportunity at OAN changed my life forever. I was looking for an

internship and ended up with a job and my own show before I even graduated college because I took the initiative to go after it. I picked up the phone and called several times. I was hung up on the first few times but that didn’t stop me. The owner appreciated my tenacity and asked me to come in for a screen test. I was nervous and anxious as any 21-year-old vying for his/her first job would be, but I never let it show. I have a mantra that I am going to walk into any room and own it. I don’t let fear or insecurity get in my way and that is a habit I have sustained throughout my career and even in my personal life. The biggest lesson I have learned along the way is to trust my gut feeling. I have trusted a lot of the wrong people throughout my career. That comes from my upbringing and my belief everyone is inherently good. While that may often be true, I’ve learned this industry will chew you up and spit you out if you don’t play smart and close to the vest with some aspects. That is also my biggest surprise, people I have trusted along the way turning on me when it was con-

venient or gave them a moment of spotlight. That is also the biggest disappointment. My lawsuit with TheBlaze was a season of my life that was brutal to go through, but I would never change it or take it back. I learned a lot about who I am and what I can withstand. I also learned that the truth, integrity and what is right is ALWAYS worth fighting for, even when it comes at a price. Spotlight: You are an amazing role model for women on both sides of the border for going after your goals and not being afraid to stand up for what you believe in. What advice do you have for females or any readers for that matter when it comes to going after your dreams and staying true to yourself in the journey? Tomi Lahren: My advice to women is to never doubt who you are or compromise it for anything. Take away all the followers, the likes, the comments, the fluff and remember who

you are inside. That is something that is NEVER worth selling out for. You may lose friends and fol- lowers by being 100% authentically and unapol- ogetically you but I stopped worrying about that a long time ago. I am far more concerned with losing myself trying to please others. Your confidence and self-worth are the most valuable thing you have. They cannot take that away from you.

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Spotlight: Do you see yourself ever running for political office? Tomi Lahren: I don’t envision that for myself because the dirty business of politics isn’t appeal- ing to me. I wouldn’t enter myself into that arena unless I truly felt my voice and leadership was absolutely necessary. For now, I am happy to be on this side holding our elected leaders account- able and exposing the swamp. Spotlight: Most if not all of our readers have seen one of your “Final Thoughts” segments, and we have to ask where the signature hand gesture sign off came from? Tomi Lahren: The wave at the end started way back at the Blaze. My style has always been very matter of fact and that ending just caps off my message. I am usually delivering a monologue that is punchy, direct and passionate. The wave at the end is almost a little wink and a nod to my haters.

“ Your confidence and self- worth are the most valuable thing you have. They cannot take that away from you.” Spotlight: Often Tomi you are in the spotlight for your controversial comments, but when it comes to your personal life you fly pretty much under the radar of the public eye. How are you able to do that? Tomi Lahren: Unfortunately, I don’t fly under the radar most of the time. I get a kick out of the articles that tell me who I am dating. It’s comical sometimes. I like to strike a balance between letting people in and showing them every side of me and also keeping some things private and close to the vest. It really is a balancing act. I will say, part of the reason I have the career and the brand I have is that I am not afraid to show people all the dimensions of me. I do an unconventional job, but I am just like anybody else. I don’t mind showing people that. It’s how they relate to me and know I am a real human being. It’s a bond I form with my audience that has allowed me to build the following I have.

Spotlight: Where do you see yourself profes- sionally in the next 5 years? Tomi Lahren: When we make plans, God laughs. I don’t know where the next 5 years will take me, but I can promise you this, I will always be 100% authentically and unapologetically me. There’s not enough money or fame in the world that could sidetrack me away from my values and core beliefs. I won’t bend for anyone or anything. Freedom and the ability to tell it like it is matters most to me, above all else. If you want to get more of Tomi Lahren you can watch her daily commentary on Fox’s streaming platform, Fox Nation. You can also follow Tomi on social media @TomiLahren for Facebook, Ins- tagram, and Twitter. So, in the words of Tomi herself, “God bless and take care.” “Freedom and the ability to tell it like it is matters most to me, above all else.”

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Spotlight on Industry Headlines

AMERICANS START TRAVELING AGAIN S everal U.S. airlines have recently resumed hiring pilots or plan to this year, the latest sign the industry expects travel demand to continue rising. Before the Covid pandemic hit, airlines were preparing for a wave of pilot retirements, which are federally mandated when pilots reach age 65. But last year’s plunge in travel forced most airlines to cut labor costs, which included offering early retirement pack- ages to pilots. Now as travel demand returns, airlines are shifting their focus back toward hiring again. Pilot training can be time-consuming and costly. So, airlines usually plan years in advance, generally so they can have enough pilots to handle peak summer travel sea- sons ahead. T he federal government navigates a $5.9-billion bail out package for Air Canada that comes with several strings attached for Canada’s largest airline through Ottawa’s Large Employer Emergency Financing Facility (LEEFF) pro- gram. In return, Air Canada agreed to several commitments including refunding tickets, resuming regional routes, pro- tecting jobs and keeping its aircraft orders. After nearly a year of subdued activity, the Canadian airline industry is showing signs of life. Some analysts had criticized the government for imposing excessive curbs on the airlines without any major financial support for the industry that led to job losses. The industry also shares some of the blame for not saving for a rainy day. AIR CANADA LANDS GOVERNMENT BAILOUT PACKAGE

CANADA’S ECONOMY GAINING MORE JOBS THAN EXPECTED That aligns with Statistics Canada’s latest inflation readings. The agency reported that its “adjusted” Consumer Price Index rose one and half percent in February from a year earlier, faster than the official CPI, but still well below the Bank of Canada’s target of two percent. I nflation may still be a theoretical concern, but not a real one, as Canada’s latest housing mania and surging commodity prices haven’t dislodged expectations that the central bank will keep prices under control. According to a Canadian Chamber of Commerce survey of 15,400 employers in January and February, only fourteen percent of companies planned to raise prices over the next three months, despite rampant anecdotal evidence of rising costs for inputs such as lumber, shipping containers and even pallets. CANADA NOT RAISING RATES ANYTIME SOON C anada’s jobs market grew for a second straight month, one more sign the nation’s economy is on the cusp of fully re- covering from the pandemic. According to Statistics Canada in Ottawa the economy added 303,100 jobs in March. That’s triple what economists were antici- pating and follows a gain of 259,200 in February. The two-month jump was led by a rebound in a retail sector hit hardest by closures over the winter. The country has now recovered all but 296,000 of the nearly 3 million jobs lost during the pandemic. For months, the data have shown an economy gaining strength, surprising even the most optimistic analysts. That resilience is fu- elling expectations for a strong rebound in 2021 after the econ- omy suffered its sharpest downturn in the post-World War II era last year.

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SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE • APRIL 2021

CONTRACTOR’S WORK-LIFE BALANCE

by Dan Monk

The entrepreneur’s brain is often a chaotic place filled with post-it notes of what to do next and ideas that seem to come from every direction and conversation. I am a list guy, I write things down to get it out of my head, otherwise, it is like a never-ending loop of replaying all the things that must be done. Often you feel like you are missing something important, sometimes you are, but more often than not it is just your entrepreneur brain working overtime. For most entrepreneurs, their business is like their child, they created it, they want to protect it and see it grow and be healthy and strong, potentially if all goes right, it will become independent and continue on its own, without any direction from you. Spending time with something you love is fulfilling and it becomes easy to spend hours working not real- izing time has passed. Seriously, a 12-16 hr day is normal and doesn’t feel like work when you are passionate and driven.

I wish I could tell you I have the secret formula for balancing the crazy schedule of an entre- preneur with the commitment to family, friends, health, and personal growth, but I don’t. So, I thought I would share what I do know: ulti- mately you have to do what is right for you and your situation! Let’s start with running a business and being a

motivated entrepreneur. Unfortunately, “the hamster doesn’t get off the wheel much.” I find myself always thinking about the company, clients, employees, growth, and opportunities. It is constant, there are always problems to be solved, areas to improve, and the ever-present opportunities that are waiting to be discovered.

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Being an entrepreneur can be lonely as you are always in your own head and family time can be impactedasbusiness rarely stops. I findmyself dis - cussing business with my wife, my always patient listener, or my daughter, my sounding board for ideas. It can be difficult to slow down and be in the present, but it is important to set aside time to share with family and friends without thinking about business. I still struggle with this and there is truly always room for improvement. Ensuring you take time for the people who mean the most in your life is important. I know, for many entre- preneurs, working on our companies is one way we like to show our families how much we care for them. We are creating successful businesses for the security of our families and if we invest wisely, often we can leave something behind that can continue to provide for them when we leave this world. Of course, this is still not a substitute for quality time with family and friends! The date nights, game nights, camping, fishing trips, vaca - tions, and anytime you spend with your family

unplugged from work is critical to ensuring your family knows you care and are present.

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SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE • APRIL 2021

Taking care of our mental and physical health can be a challenge, but if we don’t, we may have business success but be unable to enjoy it. If you don’t make time for yourself, you will sacrifice something that is impossible to purchase, your health. One thing I truly enjoy is playing hockey, it is 1 hour of turning my brain off to focus on the game! It’s a release for me - I can’t focus on making a pass or taking a shot if I’m worried about paying the bills. Another thing I enjoy is yoga as it helps me stay physically fit and flexible and I can focus on my physical presence through breathing and meditation. It may sound strange to some people to hear a 51 year old man practices yoga to care for his physical and mental health, but it is one of my solutions as an entrepreneur and I love it. Another activity I enjoy is hiking with my family and our two dogs (Nova & Reno). We take time on the weekend seeking out waterfalls in our beautiful province of Nova Scotia and the hike is always worth it! It brings us together in nature and helps to ground me for the week ahead. Planning is a constant for an entrepreneur, and I plan my week carefully to maximize my time within my business. When you run a business, there is a small distinction between spreading yourself too thin and the right amount of time with your employees, clients, suppliers, and building relationships to ensure everyone impacting your business can perform at their best. I am very fortunate as we have built a company with amazing professionals who always have my back and look out for the best interest of our clients. This has taken a lot of time and energy to develop and maintain however, is definitely worth the effort!

I wanted to share my thoughts with you, so you know there is no secret sauce to work-life balance. It is up to each individu- al to find what works for them to ensure that the success gained through business results in the life- style they desire. I certain- ly do not have it all figured out, I struggle, fail, and try again. This is the mindset of an entrepreneur, never give up, just keep improv- ing and moving forward. Do what works for you to remain balanced!

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APRIL 2021 • SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE

SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE • APRIL 2021

Canada. Roughly half of the crude oil used in Ontario comes through Line 5 and about two thirds of the crude oil used in the province of Quebec, so this is an important issue for us that we shouldn’t lose sight of. It’s one thing to stop a pipeline that prevents new supply from coming into your country. It’s quite another thing to cut off your existing supply. CEC: Is Canadian oil and gas still an important industry? Mar: The answer is yes. The word transition has different meanings to different people. Some people believe it means that we will cease using oil and gas by the end of this decade. I find that to be an incredibly naive and not well-founded belief. You cannot get to Paris targets or net zero by 2050 without having the involvement of the oil and gas industry, by every credible analysis. Take, for example, the International Energy Agency, which says oil and gas will continue to be a dominant source of energy in the world, for a couple of reasons. One is that the world’s population will grow from its current 7 billion people to perhaps 10 billion people by the end of the century. Number two is the growth of the middle class, particularly in places like Africa and India, that will be demand- ing energy. It took a century for us to build the infrastructure necessary to have fossil fuels as an important part of our quality of life. It won’t take a century to transition to other types of energy infrastruc- ture, but it’s still going to take a long time. CEC: Do you see any opportunities for the oil and gas trade relationship between Canada and the U.S.? Mar: I think the opportunity is in creating a con- tinental energy and environment strategy. I think it’s important for Canada to harmonize some of what it does with the United States.

CANADIAN & U.S. Q&A WITH GARY MAR, CEO OF THE CANADA WEST FOUNDATION by Deborah Jaremko NEED TO FIND ‘SWEET SPOT’ BALANCING ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT TOGETHER U .S. demand for Canadian oil continues to grow, building on a rich history of cross-border energy trade. But the new administration under President Joe Biden has increased uncertainty about the future of this relationship.

You cannot develop any kind of economy without access to affordable, reliable energy, and you cannot develop any kind of energy, including renewables, without having some impact on the environment. You’ve got to find that sweet spot where you’re balancing all three. And this is the opportunity for Canada and the United States to work together. “It took a century for us to build the infrastructure neces- sary to have fossil fuels as an important part of our quality of life. It won’t take a century to transition to other types of energy infrastructure, but it’s still going to take a long time.”

As Alberta’s former envoy in Washington and in Asia, Gary Mar has worked at the heart of bilat- eral relations between Canada and its trading partners. He’s also the former CEO of the Petro- leum Services Association of Canada and the current CEO of the Canada West Foundation, offering a unique perspective on the interests of Canada’s oil and gas sector in the context of its customers. Here’s what he thinks about what’s next for Canada and the U.S. CEC: What is your outlook for the energy rela- tionship between Canada and the U.S. under Joe Biden’s administration? Mar: I remain optimistic. When I arrived in Wash- ington in 2007, about 11 per cent of U.S. oil imports were from Canada. By the time I left [in 2011], it was closer to 18 or 19 per cent. Today, it’s about 48 per cent. So, we’ve not only had a long-standing relationship, it is one that has actually increased in importance. As the Biden administration goes to COP 26 in Glasgow in November, they need to take into account where their energy comes from and that there is still an enormous demand for it, as evi- denced by the lawsuit that came up from 21 U.S. attorneys general who are opposed to the revoca- tion of the Keystone XL permit.

This is something that the president can’t ignore. Whether or not that litigation is successful is almost not the point. The point is that it sends a strong signal that there are Democrats in the House of Representatives and in the U.S. Senate and in states throughout the U.S. that rely upon energy that comes from Canada that it is afford- able, reliable, and that is responsibly produced. CEC: How is the relationship impacted by the cancellation of the permits for Keystone XL? Mar: I think it’s really important to note that we still have 3.7 million barrels of oil a day that does cross the border. It’ll be up to producers to figure out the ways that they can get it to their customers, because there is demand for it. I do think that it’s important that we stand up for the importance of this type of energy. In the state of Michigan there is an issue with respect to Line 5. That’s not only important for the U.S. Midwest, but it’s also important for

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SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE • APRIL 2021

SPRINGING INTO CLEANING ACTION DESIGN OF THE TIMES I t’s that time of year! Spring is in the air and the sun is shining bright! Well, we know what that means – everything looks dusty! That sun shining in through the windows exposes all the layers of dull-light and winter living. It never fails. It jolts us all into spring cleaning action! by Megan Callahan

Spring cleaning means different things to differ- ent people. For some of us, it means give things a good dusting, tuck away our winter clothes and call it done; well for others, it is all about going all out and turning the house upside down. Which- ever way you go about it, the end result feels so good… like tulips on the counter of a decluttered kitchen. For many, there is a rut that sometimes comes along with not only spring cleaning but any major house-gutting exercise: you want it done yes- terday. Patience is a hard practice especially if it’s not already engrained in you. If you are that person, this will sound familiar: you want it all done now so you start gutting. You’re excited and committed. Three hours in and all the winter clothes from the master closet are in a huge pile. You’re happy with this start. You don’t have the tubs in from the garage yet, so you might as well start the front foyer now too, you know, to get everything ready for packing up and labelling. Hats, mitts and winter jackets are down. Wow! So much space! While you’re at it, before you head out to the garage to grab empty tubs, you start in on the kitchen cupboards. So many useless contraptions you never use and they’re taking up so much space! You get them out! While you’re in this zone, you convince yourself you were born to be a minimalist and now is your time! Ahhh, so many plans! Golden hour hits. The sun starts to fade into the evening sky. You’re proud of your progress and feel accomplished. Then reality sets in: you have

piles of ‘stuff’ everywhere and, even though your intentions were amazing, your bar may have been set too high. Ugh, you regret this exercise. But now it needs to be gone before sunup tomorrow because that’s a rough way to start the day. Your enthusiasm is gone. Everything gets thrown into tubs with minimal labelling since you’re running out of both time and motivation. This is the reality for so many people with the best of intentions, but without the knowledge of the best approach. If you master the approach, you’ve mastered the art of decluttering, whether it’s for spring cleaning, getting ready for Christ- mas, moving houses, or just organizing your life. Once you know the process, you’re good! Different personalities handle situations in differ- ent ways. The above scenario is the ‘all-in, I got this’ mentality; the people who possibly bite off more than they can chew (this is me!). Another personality type may see the future, and also feel the anxiety that goes along with what’s to come and says NOPE!

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SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE • APRIL 2021

Decluttering and re-organization can seem daunting to many of us. Regardless of your per- sonality or scenario, the approach is the same. Steps to decluttering happiness! Where to start? Decluttering can be as manageable or as monu- mental as you make it. It is important to start small and start early! Sometimes it gets messy before it gets cleaned

It is important to stick to the plan: declutter first, then organize. Once you have space freed up, you can easily figure out where all the remaining items go. Most importantly, don’t lose sight of the plan! Before you start, write it down. Go back to that check list and re-read it until it sticks. “The secret of getting ahead is getting started.” - Mark Twain

up and that is okay! When you know you’re going to be hitting the boxes in the near future, start moving items that belong elsewhere. Get every- thing to the area that it should be in. Then when it’s go-time, pick a room to start in, and don’t move on until it’s completed. Remember slow and steady wins the race! Next, make three piles and yes you will need all three: Pile #1: KEEP – This pile is important, conve- nient, relevant, or items you can’t let go of (yet!)

Pile #2: DONATE/SELL - This pile is filled with items that you know someone else can use. Let’s do our part for the earth and make our garbage pile as small as possible! Some of these items you don’t necessarily want to let go of but knowing that someone else will love it as much as you do makes it a bit easier to say bye! Pile #3: JUNK – Let’s do a dump run! It’s got to go! It doesn’t work or has no life left in it for someone else to enjoy. These items are general- ly not close to the heart, so let ‘er rip! If you get in the zone and stick to this plan, you’ll be ahead in no time! Letting go is some- times hard, but the clarity you feel at the end, when you’re lighter and more organized, goes unmatched!

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SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE • APRIL 2021

KEY FACTS ABOUT THE CANADA-US ENERGY PIPELINE NETWORK CIRCLING THE EARTH 11 TIMES

by Mark Milke & Lennie Kaplan O verview: 450,000 kilometres of pipe- lines cross the US and Canada The Canada-United States (US) pipeline network is a critical component of North American energy security. Pipelines carry crude oil, natural gas, and refined petroleum products within and between the two countries. According to the US market intelligence research firm Morning Consult, the “free, safe movement of oil and gas resources is essential to continu- ing to realize the many benefits of the intercon - nected North American energy economy. As the United States and North America at large adjust to new energy production and transpor- tation dynamics, we owe it to ourselves and to our future to commit to the expansion of modern pipeline infrastructure.” In this CEC Fact Sheet, we examine some of the key attributes of the Canada-US pipeline network that contribute to the advancement of North American energy security. Length of the Canada-US pipeline network: Over 450,000 kilometres, equivalent to 11 times the earth’s circumference CANADA Transmission pipelines move crude oil and natural gas within provinces and across provincial and international boundaries. Canada currently has a network of 117,00 kilometres (km) of transmission pipelines that deliver crude oil, natural gas, and refined petroleum products to domestic and US markets. According to Statistics Canada, in 2020 the Canadian pipeline network delivered over 3.6 million barrels per day (bpd) of crude oil and

refined petroleum products such as gasoline and diesel. Canadians consumed 44.8 billion litres of

gasoline in 2019. UNITED STATES

There are 122,300 km of crude oil pipelines, 111,045 km of natural gas liquid (NGL) pipelines, and 99,780 km of refined-product pipelines in operation in the United States. Pipelines are the primary means by which refined products are transported to distribution terminals serving consumer markets. The US national pipeline network delivers over 20 billion barrels of crude oil and refined products each year. Americans consumed 142 billion gallons of gasoline in 2019. US-CANADA TOTALS Combined, the Canada-US energy pipeline network is over 453,000 kilometres long (see Table 1). That is 11 times the earth’s circumfer- ence.

“Vast, interconnected pipeline network a critical cog in North America’s energy security.”

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SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE • APRIL 2021

ND; Pittsburgh, NH; Champlain, Grand Island, NY; Massena, NY; Niagara Falls, NY; Waddington, NY; Highgate Springs, VT; North Troy, VT; and Sumas, WA. • Natural gas imports transported from the United States to Canada by pipeline totalled nearly 2.7 billion cubic feet per day; • Canada’s imports of natural gas left from various points of exit in the US including Eastport, ID; Calais, ME; Detroit, MI; Marysville, MI; Port Huron, MI; St. Clair, Sault St Marie, MI; International Falls, Noyes, MN; Warroad, MN; Babb, MT; Havre, MT; Port of Del Bonita, MT; Port of Morgan, MT; Sweetgrass, MT; Whitlash, Corsby, ND; Portal, ND; Sherwood, ND; Pittsburg, NH; Cham- plain, Grand Island, NY; Massena, NY; Niagara Falls, NY; Waddington, NY; Highgate Springs, VT; North Troy, VT; and Sumas, WA.

Sources: Natural Resources Canada, undated; American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers, undated. Canada-US pipeline network trade flows: About 3.5 million barrels of crude and 10.1 billion cubic feet of natural gas per day The crude oil and natural gas trade flow between the US and Canada through pipelines is significant and contributes to North American economic growth and prosperity (see Table 2). In 2020, • Crude oil exports transported from Canada to the United States by pipeline were nearly 3.2 million barrels per day;

• Crude oil imports transported from the United States to the Canada by pipeline were 324,410 barrels per day.¹ In 2019, • Natural gas exports from Canada to the United States by pipeline totalled nearly 7.4 billion cubic feet per day; • Canada’s natural gas exports arrived at various points of US entry including Eastport, ID; Calais, ME; Detroit, MI; Marysville, MI; Port Huron, MI; St. Clair, Sault St Marie, MI; International Falls, Noyes, MN; Warroad, MN; Babb, MT; Havre, MT; Port of Del Bonita, MT; Port of Morgan, MT; Sweetgrass, MT; Whitlash, Corsby, ND; Portal, ND; Sherwood,

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SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS MAGAZINE • APRIL 2021

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