Outcomes Report (2019-2020)

A N N U A L OU TCOME S REPORT 2 0 1 9 - 2 0 2 0

9815 140th St reet Sur rey, BC V3T 4M4 opt ions . bc . ca

Building community

Inspiring hope

Outcomes Report 2019-2020

Table of Contents Table of Contents .......................................................................................... 1 Vision, Mission and Guiding Principles .......................................................... 5 Diversity Statement ............................................................................... 5 Who We Are …...................................................................................... 5 Get Involved........................................................................................ 6 Message from the Chair.................................................................................... 8 Message from the Chief Executive Officer .............................................................. 9 Volunteers and Staff ...................................................................................... 11 Thank You to Our Wonderful Volunteers and Staff! ......................................... 11 Volunteer Recognition ........................................................................... 11 Employee Recognition ........................................................................... 12 Staff Service....................................................................................... 13 Turnover Data ..................................................................................... 14 Staff Survey........................................................................................ 16 Committee Highlights..................................................................................... 21 Health & Safety Committee..................................................................... 21 Quality Improvements ........................................................................... 21 Community Profile Committee ................................................................. 22 Staff Training and Development Committee ................................................. 23 Quality Improvements: .......................................................................... 23 Social Wellness Committee ..................................................................... 25 Performance Quality Improvement (PQI) Committee ....................................... 25 Client and Stakeholder Satisfaction............................................................ 26 Programs and Services .................................................................................... 27 Fraser Health Crisis Line......................................................................... 27 Counselling Services.............................................................................. 27 Family Counselling................................................................................ 27 Suicide Prevention, Education and Counselling Program (SPEAC) ......................... 27 Sexual Abuse Counselling Centre (SAC) ....................................................... 28 Family Integration Services ..................................................................... 29

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Family Support Outreach (FSO)................................................................. 29 Multicultural Family Preservation Program (MFPP) .......................................... 29 Special Services for Children and Families.................................................... 30 Empower Program ................................................................................ 30 Family Strengthening and Development (FSD) ............................................... 30 Quick Response Program (QRP) ................................................................. 31 Supervised Access Program (SAP) .............................................................. 31 Nobody’s Perfect Parenting (NPP) ............................................................. 31 Employment Services ............................................................................ 32 WorkBC EMPLOYMENT Program (Whalley, Guildford & Newton)........................... 32 Early Years Services .............................................................................. 33 Child Care Resource and Referral Program (CCRR) .......................................... 33 Family Resource Programs (FRP ................................................................ 33 First Steps ......................................................................................... 34 Growing Together Daycare (GTD) .............................................................. 35 Healthiest Babies Possible (HBP) ............................................................... 36 Support for Parents of Young Children (SPYC) ............................................... 37 Immigrant Services ............................................................................... 37 BC Settlement and Integration Services (BCSIS) PROGRAM................................. 37 Community Connections Program (CCP)....................................................... 38 Moving Ahead Program (MAP) ................................................................... 39 Newcomer Employment Support Program (NESP)............................................ 39 Settlement and Integration Program (SIP) .................................................... 40 Stopping the Violence Services ................................................................. 41 Domestic Violence Intervention Program (DVIP) ............................................. 41 PEACE for Children and Youth Experiencing Violence....................................... 42 Threshold Multicultural Outreach Program ................................................... 42 Transition Houses ................................................................................. 43 Mental Health and Supported Community Living Services .................................. 44 Clubhouses......................................................................................... 44 Supported Community Living and Housing Programs ........................................ 45 The Supported Living program (SIL) ........................................................... 46

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The Community Living Support Program ...................................................... 46 Sandell House ..................................................................................... 46 Supported Independent Living Program (SIL) ................................................. 46 Surrey Bridging Program......................................................................... 47 The Sutton Apartments .......................................................................... 47 Transitional Living Program (TLP).............................................................. 47 Youth Supported Independent Living (YSIL) .................................................. 47 Homeless and Housing Services................................................................. 48 Shelter Services ................................................................................... 48 Transitional Housing Program (THP) ........................................................... 48 Homeless Outreach Program (HOP) ............................................................ 48 Reaching Home Surrey Collaborative .......................................................... 49 Homelessness Prevention Program (HPP) and Rent Supplement Program................ 49 Youth Services .................................................................................... 49 Curfew Monitoring Program (CMP) ............................................................. 50 High Risk Youth Justice Program (HRYJ) ...................................................... 50 Intensive Support and Supervision Program (ISSP) ........................................... 50 Life Skills Programming.......................................................................... 50 Mind Over Emotion Program (M/E) ............................................................. 50 Options for Youth (OFY) ......................................................................... 50 Rec Squad/Federation of BC Youth in Care Network........................................ 50 SAS-e (Survive Alive and Strive – Employment Program).................................... 51 South Asian Family Strengthening Team (SAFST) ............................................ 51 Supported Youth Independent Housing Program (SYIH)..................................... 51 Youth Transitioning Program (YTP) ............................................................ 51 Services to Access Resources and Recreation (STARR) ...................................... 52 Achievements of Note: ................................................................................... 53 Financial Report ........................................................................................... 54 Treasurer’s Report ............................................................................... 54 Statement of Financial Position ................................................................ 55 Statement of Operations ........................................................................ 56 Revenue............................................................................................ 57

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Expenses ........................................................................................... 58 Funders ..................................................................................................... 59

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Vision, Mission and Guiding Principles

Our Vision A healthy, caring community, where everyone thrives.

Our Mission We inspire hope and belonging for all.

Guiding Principles The following principles or values inspire us and guide our planning, our decision-making, and our daily work.

• Diversity Everyone has a voice. We are inclusive, respectful and fair.

• Integrity We are accountable, honest and compassionate.

• Resourcefulness We are creative, flexible and innovative.

• Collaboration We work collaboratively as partners and teams within the organization and broader community.

• Excellence We go above and beyond ordinary and strive towards the exceptional and extraordinary.

Diversity Statement

The diversity of our community takes many forms. OCS is committed to celebrating the rich diversity of our community. We are guided by the principle that celebrating diversity enriches and empowers the lives of all people.

Who We Are …

Options Community Services Society (OCS) is a non-profit society and registered charity dedicated to strengthening individuals, families and communities. OCS has been serving the communities of Surrey, Delta, White Rock, Cloverdale and many areas of the Fraser Health

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Region since 1969. OCS also operates a sister society: Habitat Housing Society, which operates affordable housing complexes for low income families and people living with mental illness.

We provide services (or deliver programs) in many areas, including: • Child Care Resource and Referral

• Children Who Witness Abuse • Community Housing Services • Early Childhood and Parenting Groups and Services • Family and Children’s Support Services including: Quick Response, Supervised Access, Family Strengthening and Development and Family Support Outreach • Family Counselling • Family Resource Programs • Fraser Health Crisis Line • Homeless Shelters and Homeless Outreach Services • Immigrant Settlement and Supports for Vulnerable Newcomers • Mental Health and Supported Housing/Living Services • Pregnancy Support and Nutrition Services • Services for Children and Youth with Special Needs • Sexual Abuse Counselling • Suicide Prevention Counselling • Supported Living and Supported Housing • Transition Houses for Women and their Children • Vocational Rehabilitation and Clubhouse Services (for adults living with mental illness)

• WorkBC Employment Services • Youth and School-based Services

OCS is fully accredited under the Council of Accreditation (COA)

GET INVOLVED Options Needs You …. Volunteer. You’ll be glad you did!

Every year, hundreds of people donate their time and skills to the diverse array of programs at OCS. This year, almost 500 volunteers contributed over 28,000 hours of their time. They engaged in a variety of activities, including: answering Fraser Health Crisis Line calls, supporting families, youth and newcomers to Canada, cooking, teaching, crafting, researching, assisting with reception and clerical tasks, building playgrounds, landscaping, painting, IT- related tasks, special projects and much, much more. We couldn’t do it without the support of our incredible volunteers! Volunteer with the Crisis Line Volunteers aged 18 and older come from all walks of life and reflect the cultural diversity of the community.

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Volunteers receive 50 hours of training before answering the Crisis Line. Some of the topic areas include: • Cultural Competence & Diversity • Crisis Intervention • Suicide & Homicide Risk Assessment • Family Violence • Boundary and Limit Setting Thank you to our Donors … Options Community Services celebrates and acknowledges all of our donors and friends who support and contribute to the work that we do. Our donors make a difference to everyone that we serve in so many ways and all gifts big and small, matter. The following are some examples of how donated dollars are used: • Developing new and innovative programming • Providing families and children with much needed household supplies • Building playgrounds and providing opportunities for children and youth to go to camp, become leaders and grow friendships • Providing food and much needed household items to those in need To learn more about how you can contribute, visit us at www.options.bc.ca or contact: Dee Sharma Deputy Executive Director – People & Culture 9815 - 140 Street Surrey, BC V3T 4M4 p: 604.584.5811 ext. 1352 e: dee.sharma@options.bc.ca

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Message from the Chair The 2019/2020 AGM was held in a larger venue to accommodate Option members and its many supporters. It was quite an impressive turn out for me to witness in my new role as Chair of Options. The 2020/2021 AGM will definitely be one we will all remember, one with the hallmarks of social distancing.

In the fall of 2019 and into the new year the Board had the opportunity to work collaboratively with the CEO and E-Team in creating a new Strategic Plan for Options. The Board was happy to endorse the final product and is excited to learn that active steps have been undertaken to implement it. In March 2020, with the pandemic sweeping the world, a new way of life unfolded, one in which we were required to practice safe social distancing, wear masks, limit our “bubble” and only leave home for essential needs. These were circumstances that no one had anticipated, and the Board had to learn to adapt and did its bit by holding virtual Board meetings. I appreciate the flexibility and commitment that each Board member showed at both Board and Committee meetings. However, what the E-team and Options staff did during this time has been outstanding, they lived true to Options core values of ‘Building Community. Inspiring Hope.” Programs continued to be offered, some in a virtual capacity and others in person as part of essential services. The resilience of Options clearly shone through and the Board was proud of everyone’s part in this. The leadership and guidance of CEO, Christine Mohr, has been instrumental in navigating Options through these unprecedented times. Christine is known for her hard work and commitment to Options, but this past year revealed her tenacity in leading through the most extreme conditions. As the first female Chair on the Board I was beyond inspired by our CEO, as was the Board.

Thank you to all the volunteers and community donors who make the great work of Options possible.

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Message from the Chief Executive Officer While 2018/19 was a year of solidifying some of our newer programs, 2019/20 has been about strengthening our internal capacity and preparing for what is to come. We achieved our 5 th COA accreditation with accolades. The quality of our services, governance, and the commitment, passion and skill of our staff shone through, making our peer review a true pleasure.

The work continues on our OptionsHUB@81 st ave development, which will include 100 units of affordable, safe, and inspiring housing as well as much-needed space for services. We anticipate shovels in the ground this fall. The expected completion date for our Mental Health Assisted Living residence is August 2020. This residential resource will provide homes and support for 40 individuals and is made possible through our partnership with BC Housing and the Fraser Health Authority. We proudly celebrated our first year of operations with a new WorkBC Employment Services model, operating three employment centres along with partners: Pacific Community Resources Society, Phoenix Drug & Alcohol Recovery & Education Society, Open Door Group, Sources Community Resources Society, Aboriginal Community Career Employment Services Society and the YMCA. This model is new to the province, bringing its own challenges, as is always the case with significant change. In recognition of our continued growth, we added two new key senior positions to support services and staff. We welcomed Khim Tan to the position of Deputy Executive Director, Employment and Immigrant Services and Dee Sharma to the position of Deputy Executive Director, People & Culture. In the fall of 2019, we began the work of developing a new vision, mission and strategic plan through a highly collaborative process that included board, management, staff, as well as input from other community stakeholders. That plan is available on our website. The COVID-19 pandemic struck at the end of our fiscal year. Options moved quickly to find means of safely providing essential services. We appreciate the efforts of all staff and of specific note, staff working in our shelters, transition houses and other residential settings, as well as the crisis line, so that the most vulnerable in our community were safe. We are blessed with a wise and committed Board of Directors and I extend a big thank you to them. I want to acknowledge Kamaljit Lehal especially, in her new role as Board Chair. Kamaljit is uniquely qualified for this role given her 24 years of service on the Board. I have truly appreciated the CEO/Board Chair relationship that we have forged.

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Outcomes Report 2019-2020

Thank you to our amazing staff, volunteers, community partners, donors and other supporters for your ongoing commitment to community and support for Options.

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Volunteers and Staff Thank You to Our Wonderful Volunteers and Staff! Volunteer Recognition

Options had 659 volunteers in 2019, which was an increase from 69 volunteers since 2018. We also can make note that we hosted 22 practicum students through the year. Instead of Service Awards, volunteers receive Milestone pins for giving 200, 400, 600 and 800 hours of their time. This year with the growth in volunteer hours, additionally 1000, 1500 & 2000 hours Milestone Pins were added showing bronze, silver and gold status. In 2019, 98 volunteers from the Crisis Line and Board of Directors received pins. There were 2 Board of Directors that received the 1000 hours Milestone pins in 2019

70

Milestone Pins for Volunteers for 2019 Crisis Line

12

6

2

1

1

1

1

200 Hours

400 Hours

600 Hours

800 Hours

1000 hours

1500 hours

2000 hours

Crisis Line

70

12

6

1

1 2

Board of Directors

1 4

1

Other

Options celebrates National Volunteer Week every year and celebrated National Volunteer Week April 7th to the 13th in 2019. There were 659 volunteers that received an Options thank you card with a Starbucks gift card attached as a token of our gratitude for the hours of service contributed to our agency. Each program arranged and prepped

distribution of appreciation gifts for their own volunteers. We are extremely grateful for all our fabulous volunteers!

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Outcomes Report 2019-2020

Employee Recognition

Employees receive recognition every 5 years. In 2019, we awarded 37 individuals with service awards. The award consists of a certificate and letter acknowledging the years of service along with a cheque, for which the amount increases every 5 years. After 25 years of service, employees also receive a specialty plaque with our agency colors/theme. Managers are encouraged to present the award publicly, and individualize the presentation of all the service awards.

The figure below shows the number of service awards given out from 2013 to 2019.

In 2019, Options had 4 individuals celebrate 15 years and 1 individual celebrate 20 years of service. It is remarkable to comment that we also had 9 people reaching between 31 and 39 years of service! Employees at Options are also encouraged to publicly appreciate each other’s efforts, and has several initiatives that increase appreciation and recognition. These include: • Regular potlucks and events celebrating the diversity of cultural backgrounds

• Children and Staff Christmas Parties • Kudos at Leadership Team meetings

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Staff Service

At the end of 2019, Options had on record 531 employees. Only a slight increase overall from last year. The most significant changes were to the number of Temporary positions being replace by Permanent Full Time positions. This speaks to more stable funding and overall workforce increase.

# of Employees in 2018

# of Employees in 2017

Type of Employees

# of Employees

Full Time

298

247

233

Casual

103

102

101

Perm Part Time w/Benefits *

76

65

61

Perm Part Time

32

34

37

Temporary Positions

22

15

27

*permanent part time employees over 20 hrs. per week

# of Employees in 2018

Age Range

# of Employees

Worth noting is the number of employees over age 65. Of the 11 employees in this category, 6 employees are 66 – 69 yrs old, 5 employees are over 70 yrs old

60

52

<26

151 148

131 115

26-35 36-45 46-55 56-65

90 71 11

88 61 16

>65

# of Employees in 2018

Length of Service

# of Employees

This year we seen the number of staff here under 1 year increase by 67% (from 90 in 2018).

151 227

90

under 1 yr

209

1 – 5 yrs

59 94

78 86

6 – 10 yrs

11 +

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Outcomes Report 2019-2020

Turnover Data

Sector Analysis This year Options had 101 employees leave employment, this was an increase of 13 employees The figure below displays the turnover numbers from 2017 in comparison with similar agencies within our sector (General Services). These figures are further displayed by union, non-union and management/excluded positions.

In 2019, Options had 107 employees leave employment, this was a decrease of 19 employees from 2018 (126 or 15% decrease).

• 54 employees were Permanent Full Time or Permanent Part Time - 37 Full Time - 17 Part Time • 26 employees were Casual • 7 employees were Temporary Full Time or Temporary Part Time • 20 employees were Summer Students hired on a Seasonal basis

Turnover by Status - 3 Year Comparison

Seasonal

Temporary

Casual

Permanant

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

2019 2018 2017

Top Position Losses

In 2019, Options lost 10 more Permanent Full Time or Permanent Part Time employees and 8 more Casual staff than last year. Temporary and Seasonal employees stayed somewhat comparable to the previous year.

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The top 3 positions lost for 2019 were Child & Youth Care Counsellor (9), Shelter Worker (7), and Transition House Worker (6):

In 2019, HR arranged 351 internal and external job postings. The chart shows the breakdown of types of positions needing to be filled, compared to last year. External job postings are shared on the Options Website, CSSEA, The Federation of Community Social Services, WorkingInNonProfit.ca, KPU and UFV, LinkedIn as well as Craig List or Charity Village. The number of permanent full-time postings in 2019 was higher by 97 than in 2018. New programs for the year of 2019 included Delta Clubhouse, Delta Community Living Support, SAFE programs (Youth Justice), Skills Link, ( Survive, Alive and Strive - Employment program), Mosaic Migrant Workers and Mosaic Multicultural Safe Dating. Of the 178 postings in total that were for “new” opportunity, the top program was Delta Clubhouse with 9 positions, the Youth Justice SAFE program with 8 positions, and Skills Link the Survive, Alive and Strive – Employment program with 5 positions.

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Job Posting Comparison - 3 years

Permanent Full Time Permanent Part Time Casual Temporary Full Time Temporary Part Time

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

160

180

Permanent Full TimPeermanent Part Time Casual

Temporary Full TimTeemporary Part Time

2019 2018 2017

166

73 72

49 30 38

42 30 67

22 29 29

69 80

61 20 9 2018 2017

Staff Survey Our annual staff survey took place in February this year. We typically conduct this survey in October but with our agency in the thick of our strategic planning process from October through January, our survey was delayed. We again offered an incentive (randomly drawn gift cards) for staff to participate in completing the survey.

This year we had 213 of 526 active staff complete our survey for a 41% response rate. While this percentage is above what is considered acceptable (30-40%), this year’s response rate represents a decrease of 10% participating in the survey from last year. In 2018- 2019, we had 240 out of 473 staff respond to the survey .

Survey Response

2019-

21

52

2018-

24

47

0

20

40

60

Total # of

# of Staff

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To these questions, responses were as follows:

1) Would you recommend working at Options?

205 Respondents 87% SAID “YES”

2) What one practice OCS could change to enhance your life at work? • The majority of responses demonstrated a desire for increased pay and/or benefits . • Many staff also indicated they would like increased opportunities to connect with staff from other programs in OCS. • The majority of remaining responses fell into the category of increased learning opportunities and communication across the organization, including opportunities to learn more about other OCS programs.

3) What keeps you at OCS? • Flexibility ............................ 66% • Culture ............................... 65% • Professional Development ......... 48% • Healthcare Benefits ................ 42% • Pay.................................... 37% Please note: participants could select more than one response to this question.

4) What attracted them (new employees) to Options? Almost all written responses could be traced back to our culture , our people and our reputation in the community.

5) What single policy or practice does OCS do to best improve your life at work? Continues to highlight that Options’ culture, supporting a work/life balance whenever we can, and providing staff with opportunities for growth and learning that are most important. Responses to the following statements were: “My supervisor ….” a) Recognizes and appreciates me and my work. b) Supports me in understanding how to be successful in my job. c) Exhibits patience and calm under high stress. Frequent to always Frequent to always Frequent to always 82% 77% 86%

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Outcomes Report 2019-2020

The following staff experience responses were in the above average to extremely high range:

a) Meaning and

b) Level of Stress at Work

c) High Sense of Community at Work

d) Job Satisfaction

Significance in Their Work Above Average to Extremely High

Above Average to Extremely High

Above Average to Extremely High

Above Average or High

83%

46%

68%+

73%+  3% from last year

 1.5% from last year

 3% from last year

No change from last year

Actions:

1) Level of Stress at Work This year saw an increase of 3% in staff reporting above average to high levels of stress at work. This response continues to be of concern as we are committed to the health and well-being of our staff and the promotion of a healthy work environment. As in the previous year, we will be paying extra attention to discussing the importance of mental wellness with staff at the program level. Mental Health Bootcamp This year, Options is promoting the Mental Health Bootcamp program. This online program began on April 1 st and provides strategies, videos and exercises for participants to engage in to promote and increase mental wellness. Staff are able to engage in the learning modules during their regular work hours as a way to increase participation and show the importance of one’s mental health in the work we do. Employee Assistance Program This year, we will continue to promote our Employee Assistance Program and highlight the resources and services this program has available for staff and their families. We have also recently hosted the Mobile Response Team, a community resource, at Options’ Leadership Team so that managers are aware of this service and promote its use with program staff. By increasing the awareness of these services, we are hopeful to increase the number of staff readily accessing these services should they need them. 2) Policy Changes Some feedback noted policy changes that staff are concerned about, with a request that changes be re- visited. A review will be conducted and reported back on by the end of May.

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3) Comparable Pay in Non-profits When asked, “compared to other similar non-profits, do you feel you are paid fairly,” employee responses were:

• Yes .............................................................. 47.8% • Did not feel they are paid fairly in comparison ......... 32.68% • Opted out/didn’t know...................................... 19.51%

Anecdotal information suggests that we do pay a similar or higher wage in the majority of our service areas, however a formal review may be of benefit to confirm this.

It is encouraging to see that of the staff who completed the survey: • 72% have an above average to extremely high sense of connection to OCS’ mission. • 73% reported an above average to extremely high level of job satisfaction. • 87% indicated that they would recommend working at Options to others.

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Committee Highlights

Health & Safety Committee

Monthly H&S meetings are held primarily at the Newton office location. This committee is comprised of both Union and non-Union frontline staff and management at Options. OCS work sites and/or programs are requested to have representation on the committee, as either a member or alternate member, ensuring employees throughout the agency are provided with up-to-date information on Health & Safety issues and/or have opportunity to bring questions, concerns or information forward that is relevant to their work site/program. The Health & Safety (H&S) Committee provided orientation to new staff/practicum students/volunteers during Options Orientation Workshop. An Options Health & Safety Committee Member facilitates this orientation. Quality Improvements • H&S reviewed Incident/Investigation reporting requirements and provided recommendations to Program Managers, employees or the Executive Team as follow-up to incidents. • In conjunction with the PQI and Human Resources Manager, the Health & Safety Committee Co-Chair worked to review and update the agency Incident Report to ensure program staff and Managers interpreted, completed and followed through with report requirements. In addition, modifications to the report were made to ensure identification of gender were both appropriate and inclusive.

• H&S Manual/Orientation: The New Occupational H&S manual with updated materials & information has been approved and will be “rolled out” in the upcoming months.

• Monthly Drills: Re-distribution of monthly drills was made to ensure months selected for drills provided opportunity for “realistic” procedures to be practiced and followed. For example, the monthly drill for a Fire Drill was scheduled in the month of August, a month wherein many staff are absent due to vacations. This drill was rescheduled to September, providing better opportunity for sites to be occupied by staff and clients who would become familiar or reminded of the fire drill procedures. • Site Inspections: As an agency, in June of 2019 provided an opportunity for the majority of its sites to be visited by COA peer reviewers who assessed programs and Health & Safety requirements. In preparation for this visit, the Health and Safety Committee provided reminders and recommendations to the agency and programs as to Health & Safety requirements. Two of the Health & Safety Committee Members partook in an interview with a COA peer reviewer that provided an overarching summary of the Health & Safety

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procedures and policies for the agency. The agency’s Health & Safety policies passed accreditation with no recommendations.

• Committee Membership experienced many shifts throughout this past year, in both members and alternate members. The Committee worked with the Executive and Senior Leadership teams to identify OCS work sites/programs that should have representation on the committee and to designate employees that could be available for a two year term of service. As a result, the committee and alternate membership has stabilized and a greater proportion of OCS sites and programs are represented. • Training: All members and alternates of the Joint Occupational Health & Safety Committee have been trained in the mandatory Joint Occupational Health & Safety Committee Level One Training. Additional training was also offered to committee members and their alternate members throughout the year. Half of the committee members and their alternates participated in Joint Occupational Health & Safety Committee Level Two and one member has also been trained in Critical Incident and Investigation Reporting.

Community Profile Committee

The purpose of the Community Profile Committee is to increase awareness of the agency and its programs throughout the community.

Quality Improvements • Added online calendar and registration features to the website • Introduced the use of a social media dashboard to coordinate and schedule social media efforts across programs and channels. • Implemented a new FaceBook feature of location pages for specific programs to increase our reach • Under contractual requirements, created separate employment social media channels • Started regular meetings with social media users across the agency to share knowledge and best practices. Website traffic has remained steady this year compared to last year, but the percentage of users accessing the site through mobile has continued to increase. LinkedIn continues to grow as we increase our recruitment efforts using the channel. FaceBook has seen significant increases this year from the increased effort into the employment specific channels, the addition of the location pages and an increase in the number of agency staff incorporating social media into their program activities.

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Website 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 % change 80,656 149,775 152,604 +1.89% 284,874 399,315 403,628 +1.08%

Users

Page views

% mobile traffic

44%

64%

68% +6.25%

LinkedIn

Followers at YE

486

654

1,179 +80.28%

Impressions for posts Referred to website

22,657 50,350 58,473 +16.13%

119

140

762 +444.29%

FaceBook

Followers at YE Engaged users

5,532

6,074 10,063 +65.67%

17,278 32,830 67,190 +104.66%

Video views (30 sec or to end)

176

8,881 12,588 +41.74%

Referred to website

4,406

7,190

9,988 +38.92%

In addition to our main platforms, we have been working to grow other channels as well. Here is Instagram as an example.

Instagram 2018-19

2017-18

2019-20 % change

Followers at YE

0 0

541

1,338 +147.32%

Reach

12,975 52,010 +300.85%

Our posts and information have continued to bring attention to special events, need for volunteers, career postings and increased awareness around the community.

Staff Training and Development Committee

The Staff Training and Development Committee of OCS focuses on identifying and implementing training and education opportunities which are common across the agency.

Quality Improvements: • Non Violent Crisis Intervention: This year, our agency CPI instructor launched the Flex training. This new the hybrid training is more flexible for some programs as the staff can do a lot of the work online prior to the actual training day (about 2 - 3 hours) and then there is a brief review and the physical part of the CPI course is taught (another 3-4 hours). The new Flex training has been well received by staff.

• Wisdom Within: This year, the Staff Development Committee updated and revamped the proudly offered 7 different Wisdom Within presentation at 4

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locations throughout the agency. Topics presented were “How to Work with Interpreters”, “Resources/Barriers for Refugee Claimants”, “Using Trauma- Informed Language”, Suicide Prevention for Youth” x 3 sessions, “Affordable Child Care Benefit”, “What WorkBC has to Offer” and “Helpful Approach to Substance Use”. • Orientation Workshop: This year, the committee continued to offer the newly, revised Agency Orientation presentation. The new workshop contains group activities to learn about our mandatory policies, games & prizes, and agency videos. There is more emphasis on new staff seeking out more information about their new employer via our website and public drive. • Mental Health First Aid: This fiscal year, the committee certified another instructor to ensure the agency remained with two instructor to facilitate the Mental Health First Aid training. This two-day course provided participants with skills to provide initial help to individuals experiencing mental health problems related to substance misuse, depression, anxiety, trauma and psychosis. • Respectful Workplace Workshop: This year, the Staff Development Committee updated and revamped this workshop. The existing facilitator along with the workshop developer rolled out the new workshop in May. To ensure the agency has skilled facilitators to present this workshop, the committee recruited 7 new facilitators. The 7 new facilitators viewed the new workshop, spent time to train with the existing facilitator before facilitating the workshop in pairs. This approach has provided the agency with scheduled workshops throughout the year. • Naloxone/Harm Reduction: In order to meet our agency’s commitment to ensuring staff are trained in recognizing overdoses and administration of Naloxone, the Staff Development Committee added a number of new agency trainers. • Emergency First Aid: This year, the Staff Development Committee offered 9 workshops to staff. In response to a training need by a new Youth program, the committee collaborated with the program to open up some training spaces to clients. This cost- sharing venture provided a valuable opportunity to support an agency program towards their success. • Building Bridges through Understanding the Village: workshops were offered November 15 & November 18 th at Beecher Place in Crescent Beach. In partnership with Alexandra Neighbourhood House, who donated the venue, the committee was able to include 100 staff, partner agency staff and community partners to this well received workshop. Other

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than parking and no hot water for tea, the participants were impressed with the facilitators and the messaging. It is always a pleasure in offering this workshop.

Social Wellness Committee

The Social Wellness Committee consists of a committed and energetic group of staff who assume most of the responsibility for planning and organizing staff social events, to promote inter-program sharing and strengthen employee engagement and happiness at work.

The committee organizes events throughout the year. This past year we focused our lunchtime events to coincide with various cultural and ethnic celebrations.

On average over 60 people attend our lunchtime events and over 270 staff attended the annual Christmas Party. The list of events included:

• Summer Barbeques, • Ramadan Celebration • Lunar New Year Celebration • Pink Shirt Day • Diwali

• Cinco de Mayo • Curry Cook off • Chili Cook off • Indigenous Peoples Day • Golf Tournament • Take Our Kids to Work Day • Annual Christmas Events for staff and children

Performance Quality Improvement (PQI) Committee

Members of the PQI Committee are comprised of front line staff, managers and senior managers who represent all OCS program areas, and who are passionate and committed about quality improvement. The committee attends to ongoing PQI developments, provides support and feedback to programs, and oversees, improves and monitors regular processes such as staff surveys, quarterly and annual reports and other key activities. The PQI Committee also champion the concept of PQI and make it more meaningful and relevant across the agency.

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

During the 2019-2020 reporting period, the PQI Committee engaged in the review and development of new and existing policies, the revision of the PQI reporting templates and program annual plans, and identifying key agency wide areas for improvement. There was also considerable attention paid to the processes and preparation required for the successful re-accreditation that took place in June 2019.

Client and Stakeholder Satisfaction

Client Feedback (all programs)

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

2019/2020

97.4% 97.8% 90.1%

98.2% 98.8% 98.1%

97.9% 98.1% 96.7%

98.3% 98.6% 97.7%

Clients satisfied with OCS programs

• Clients who felt welcomed and respected

Clients who felt their goals were met

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

2019/2020

Funder and Community/Partner/ Stakeholder Feedback (all programs) • Stakeholders satisfied with OCS programs and staff’s skills and service • Stakeholders who felt the programs were welcoming and respectful

98.1%

90.4%

97.6%

98.9%

97.2%

92.3%

96.6%

97.6%

Stakeholders who would recommend an OCS program/refer to it again

96.0%

90.9%

95.2%

96.9%

~results include “always” and “almost always” responses

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Outcomes Report 2019-2020

Programs and Services

Fraser Health Crisis Line

The 24-hour Crisis Line is designed to provide an immediate, appropriate response to individuals experiencing varying degrees of distress which includes provision of emotional support and information that will result in the desired outcome of the caller’s increased ability to cope. The service delivery model is based on 90% provision by trained and professionally supervised volunteers, and the remaining 10% delivered by staff. All call-takers must successfully complete the volunteer training and demonstrate competency in communication, counseling, risk assessment, and referral-making skills. They must also have knowledge of mental health issues including suicide and addiction, family and domestic violence, and other related areas. Every call-taker has at their immediate disposal a Quick Reference Guide that ensures calls are responded to in a consistent and appropriate manner.

22,159 volunteer hours 47,887 calls received Over 83% of callers indicate that their ability to cope has increased

Counselling Services

FAMILY COUNSELLING This program provides short-term (up to 10 sessions max) individual, couple and family counselling to residents of Surrey with children 18 and under by referral via MCFD intake. The family counselling program works with people to achieve and foster healthier relationships, work through anxiety and depression, coping skills for separation and divorce, parent-child conflict resolution and increasing self-esteem.

Outcomes: a) To maintain the child safely in the home

b) Reduce or eliminate problems identified by program participants at the outset of service c) Improve the social, emotional and behavioural functioning of children and youth, caregivers and parents who participate in the program. SUICIDE PREVENTION, EDUCATION AND COUNSELLING PROGRAM (SPEAC) The Suicide Prevention, Education and Counselling program provides suicide risk assessment, crisis intervention and short-term counselling (up to 10 sessions max) to children and adolescents who are experiencing thoughts of suicide, are affected by the loss of a friend or family member to suicide, or who have made a recent suicide attempt. The SPEAC team also

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

presents suicide prevention workshops in schools and community agencies in Surrey, White Rock, and Langley.

Outcomes: a) To stop children and youth who are participating in the program from attempting or completing suicide; b) To improve the social, emotional, and behavioural functioning of children and youth who are participating in the program; c) To improve the social, emotional, and behavioural functioning of children and youth who have lost a loved one to suicide; d) To improve the caregiver’s/parent’s ability to maintain a safe physical and emotional environment for the client; e) To increase the ability of youth to recognize and respond appropriately to suicide risk indicators amongst their peers. SEXUAL ABUSE COUNSELLING CENTRE (SAC) The SAC program provides both short-term and long-term (up to 2 years) counselling to children and youth from Surrey where sexual abuse has either been disclosed or is suspected. Support and psycho-educational information is also offered to non-offending family members. Outcomes: a) To maintain the child safely in the home; b) To improve the social emotional and behavioural functioning of children and youth who have been sexually abused; c) To stop re-victimization of sexually abused children and youth; d) To improve the ability of non-offending family members to cope with the stressors related to the disclosure of child sexual abuse in the family; e) To increase each non-offending family member’s knowledge of sexual abuse and related systems issues; f) And to increase the community’s awareness of sexual abuse and related social issues Outputs Family Counselling # of families served (this is a combination of individuals, couples and families) 334

SPEAC # of children/youth who attended a workshop: 329 # of workshops: 6 # of unique individuals served : 141

SAC # of clients served: 173

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Outcomes Report 2019-2020

Family Integration Services

FAMILY SUPPORT OUTREACH (FSO) The FSO program provides outreach parenting, basic counselling, and support services to MCFD referred clients with children between the ages of 0-13, assessed at low to medium risk. The primary long-term goal of the FSO program is to work toward supporting families,

educating parents, and promoting safe and healthy home environments. The immediate goals are to foster better communication and more positive interaction between parents and children, educate parents on normal stages of child development, introduce more effective ways to respond to particular child behaviours, and connect families to other resources within our community.

I found my worker to be a stabilizing force when my life has felt very chaotic.

138 people received service 2085 service units were delivered 76% of participants report using more resources or places in the community to meet their family’s needs and 64% report experiencing less disruption in their lives.

Measure Question: On a scale of 1 to 5 (1 = dissatisfied, 5 = satisfied), please rate your experience with:

Results # of 5’s

# of 3-4

# of 1-2

Learning New Parenting Skills

14

2

1

Using more resources or places in the community to meet their family’s needs Experiencing less crisis and disruption in their lives

13

3

1

11

2

4

MULTICULTURAL FAMILY PRESERVATION PROGRAM (MFPP) The Multicultural Preservation Program provides support to MCFD referred multicultural families to become fully functioning empowered caregivers. MFPP provides services of family preservation and reunification, general intervention, therapeutic intervention/treatment, monitoring and supervision of visitation. Services are provided in Arabic, Punjabi, Mandarin and Tagalog. MFPP has the ability to provide services in other languages with the assistance of interpreters.

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