Outcomes Report 2018-2019

Outcomes Report 2018-2019

Options Community Services

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

Table of Contents

Vision, Mission and Values ............................................................................... 5

Diversity Statement ..................................................................................... 5

Who We Are …............................................................................................ 6

Get Involved.............................................................................................. 7

Message from the Chair .................................................................................. 8

Message from the Executive Director ................................................................. 9

Volunteers and Staff .....................................................................................10

Thank You to Our Wonderful Volunteers and Staff! ............................................... 10

Staff Service ............................................................................................. 11

Turnover Data ........................................................................................... 11

Employee Recognition ................................................................................. 13

Staff Survey.............................................................................................. 14

Highlights ................................................................................................ 14

Committee Highlights ....................................................................................16

Health & Safety Committee ........................................................................... 16

Community Profile Committee ....................................................................... 17

Staff Training and Development Committee........................................................ 18

Social Wellness Committee............................................................................ 19

Performance Quality Improvement (PQI) Committee ............................................. 19

Client and Stakeholder Satisfaction.................................................................. 20

Programs and Services...................................................................................21

Counselling Services.................................................................................... 21

Family Counselling.................................................................................. 21

Suicide Prevention, Education And Counselling Program (SPEAC) ........................... 21

Sexual Abuse Counselling Centre (SAC).......................................................... 22

Special Services For Children And Families ......................................................... 23

Family Integration Services ........................................................................... 24

Family Support Outreach (FSO) ................................................................... 24

Support For Parents Of Young Children (SPYC) ................................................. 24

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Family Strengthening and Development (FSD).................................................. 25

Quick Response program (QRP) ................................................................... 25

Supervised Access program (SAP)................................................................. 26

Nobody’s Perfect parenting (NPP)................................................................ 26

Employment Services................................................................................... 27

Whalley Employment Services Centre (WESC) .................................................. 27

Early Years Services .................................................................................... 27

Healthiest Babies Possible (HBP) ................................................................. 27

First Steps............................................................................................ 29

Child Care Resource and Referral Program (CCRR) ............................................ 29

Growing Together Daycare (GTD) ................................................................ 30

Young Families Subsidized Housing............................................................... 31

Family Resource Programs (FRP) ................................................................. 31

Fraser Health Crisis Line............................................................................... 33

Multicultural Family Preservation Program (MFPP) ................................................ 33

Immigrant Services ..................................................................................... 34

Immigrant Settlement Program (ISP) ............................................................ 34

Moving Ahead Program (MAP) ..................................................................... 35

Newcomer Employment Support Program (NESP) .............................................. 36

Community Connections Program ................................................................ 37

Stopping the Violence Services ....................................................................... 38

Transition Houses....................................................................................... 38

Threshold ............................................................................................ 39

Domestic Violence Intervention Program (DVIP) ............................................... 40

Children and Youth for Domestic Peace ......................................................... 41

Mental Health and Supported Community Living Services ........................................ 41

Clubhouses ........................................................................................... 41

Supported Community Living and Housing Programs .......................................... 42

The Supported Independent Living program (SIL).............................................. 42

The Community Living Support Program ........................................................ 43

The Congregate Housing Program ................................................................ 43

The Surrey Bridging Program...................................................................... 43

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

Sandell House ....................................................................................... 43

The Sutton Apartments Program ................................................................. 43

Youth Supported Independent Living (YSIL)..................................................... 44

Transitional Living Program (TLP) ................................................................ 44

Homeless and Housing Services....................................................................... 44

Shelter Services ..................................................................................... 44

Transitional Housing Program (THP) ............................................................. 45

Homeless Outreach Program (HOP) .............................................................. 45

Housing First Partnering Strategy (HPS) ......................................................... 45

Homelessness Prevention Program (HPP) and Rent Supplement Program.................. 46

Youth Services........................................................................................... 46

Surrey Youth Independent Housing Program (SYIH)............................................ 46

Services to Access Resources and Recreation (STARR) ........................................ 46

Achievements of Note ...................................................................................48

Financial Report ..........................................................................................51

Treasurer’s Report...................................................................................... 51

Statement of Financial Position ...................................................................... 52

Statement of Operations .............................................................................. 53

Revenue.................................................................................................. 54

Expenses ................................................................................................. 55

Funders.....................................................................................................56

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Options Community Services

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Vision, Mission and Values

Our Vision

We inspire hope and belonging for all.

Our Mission

We are a diverse organization, united in the purpose of helping people to help themselves and promoting safe, healthy, vibrant communities.

Our Values

Diversity At OCS, everyone has a voice. We are inclusive, respectful and fair.

Integrity We are accountable, honest and compassionate.

Resourcefulness We are creative, flexible and innovative.

Collaboration We work collaboratively as partners and teams within the organization and broader community.

Excellence We go above and beyond ordinary and strive towards the exceptional and extraordinary.

Diversity Statement

The diversity of our community takes many forms. OCS is committed to celebrating the rich diversity of our community. We are guided by the principle that celebrating diversity enriches and empowers the lives of all people.

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

Who We Are …

Options Community Services Society (OCS) is a non-profit society and registered charity dedicated to strengthening individuals, families and communities. OCS has been serving the communities of Surrey, Delta, White Rock, Cloverdale and many areas of the Fraser Health Region since 1969. OCS also operates a sister society: Habitat Housing Society, which operates affordable housing complexes for low income families and people living with mental illness.

We provide programs in many areas, including: • Child Care Resource and Referral

• Children Who Witness Abuse • Community Housing Services • Early Childhood and Parenting Groups and Services • Family and Children’s Support Services including: Quick Response, Supervised Access, Family Strengthening and Development and Family Support Outreach • Family Counselling • Family Resource Programs • Fraser Health Crisis Line • Homeless Shelters and Homeless Outreach Services • Immigrant Settlement and Supports for Vulnerable Newcomers • Mental Health and Supported Housing/Living Services • Pregnancy Support and Nutrition Services • Services for Children and Youth with Special Needs • Sexual Abuse Counselling • Suicide Prevention Counselling • Supported Living and Supported Housing • Transition Houses for Women and their Children • Vocational Rehabilitation and Clubhouse Services (for adults living with mental illness)

• WorkBC Employment Services • Youth and School-based Services

OCS is fully accredited under the Council of Accreditation (COA)

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GET INVOLVED Options Needs You …. Volunteer. You’ll be glad you did!

Every year, hundreds of people donate their time and skills to the diverse array of programs at OCS. This year, almost 500 volunteers contributed over 28,000 hours of their time. They engaged in a variety of activities, including: answering Fraser Health Crisis Line calls, supporting families, youth and newcomers to Canada, cooking, teaching, crafting, researching, assisting with reception and clerical tasks, building playgrounds, landscaping, painting, IT-related tasks, special projects and much, much more. We couldn’t do it without the support of our incredible volunteers! Volunteer with the Crisis Line Volunteers aged 18 and older come from all walks of life and reflect the cultural diversity of the community. Volunteers receive 50 hours of training before answering Crisis Line calls. Some of the topic areas include: • Cultural Competence & Diversity • Crisis Intervention • Suicide & Homicide Risk Assessment • Family Violence • Boundary and Limit Setting Thank you to our Donors … Options Community Services celebrates and acknowledges all of our donors and friends who support and contribute to the work that we do. Our donors make a difference to everyone that we serve in so many ways and all gifts big and small, matter. The following are some examples of how donated dollars are used: • Developing new and innovative programming • Providing families and children with much needed household supplies • Building playgrounds and providing opportunities for children and youth to go to camp, become leaders and grow friendships • Providing food and much needed household items to those in need To learn more about how you can contribute, visit us at http://www.options.bc.caor contact: Janice Boyle Director of Development 9815 - 140 Street Surrey, BC V3T 4M4 p: 604.584.5811 ext. 1342 e: mailto:janice.boyle@options.bc.ca

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

Message from the Chair Options Community Services is strong and resilient in its commitment: To inspire hope and belonging for all. This year has again demonstrated the organization’s capacity to respond to community needs in a concerted, focused and resourceful fashion. Options has developed new and extended programs and services in the most critical areas of social need. It has been my pleasure to be part of the team. The OCS board and management value and exemplify diversity, integrity, collaborative commitment, excellence and resourcefulness. These core values will sustain its good work in the years ahead. Community needs, loneliness and growing inequality present an urgent challenge to the organization. It is critical that the organization continues to serve with efficiency and optimal effectiveness. Tim Beachy Board Chair

This is the last report I will write as Options Chair. I am grateful for my time as Chair and will continue to serve the Society as a Director.

I am pleased that Kamaljit Lehal has accepted the role of Chair. She has served on the Board faithfully for many years and she brings a strong advocate voice for Options services, experience in leadership and commitment to Options’ values.

I congratulate Christine Mohr, the Executive and Leadership Teams for bringing the expertise, values and commitments which make Options the best it can be.

Strategic challenges ahead include:  Keeping the public engaged and supportive in Options’ work. The commitment to a vibrant public presence remains critical.  Building on sustainable, collaborative programs and services success. Engaging in a wide range of partnerships must produce results that increase belonging for people.  Sustaining legacy programs for children and families needs to be combined with innovation and change. Shifting community needs requires leadership in every corner.  Developing more flexible and resilient technical and human infrastructure. This requires increased financial commitment. I have had the opportunity to chair the Board of Directors for the last six years. It is a privilege to work with a great group of committed Board Directors, Committee Chairs and the Executive Staff.

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

Message from the Executive Director

2018/ 2019 has been a year of solidifying some of our more recent developments such as the operation of Ted Kuhn Towers, our first full year of operation at Bill Reid Shelter & Transitional Housing while at the same time continuing to work on other ventures including our 81 st Avenue and an assisted mental health facility for Surrey. We are particularly proud of the positive shifts that staff have been able to achieve at Ted Kuhn Towers.

Christine Mohr Executive Director

Recognizing the dire need for affordable, safe, and inspiring housing, Options’ Board and Management has committed to a course of focused learning about housing needs and organizational capacity building so that we are better able to address this important need in our community. Our 81 st avenue development will be the first fruit of our commitment with both 100 homes and program space at this location. Other key work this year included preparing several major proposals in response to government tender calls. The tendering of services, especially the re-tendering of those that are well established and valued, is always difficult in the social services sector where collaboration is an everyday necessity for the good of the communities served. Options is pleased to have been successful with our bid to continue providing WorkBC Employment Services in North Surrey as well as in Newton which is new to us. At the same time, we understand how difficult it has been for our colleagues who were not successful with their bids, especially for services that they have successfully provided for many years. Such is the case for Options with its proposal for Early Years Services in which we, along with our partners, were not the winning bid. We are very pleased with our successful bid to provide an array of mental health services in Delta. We are awaiting the outcome of several other proposals. We look forward to our 5 th accreditation review in June 2019; I thank all staff for their ongoing attention to quality improvement and for their good work preparing for our peer review.

I want to especially thank Tim Beachy, as he leaves his role as Board Chair after 6 years. His leadership has been truly inspiring and his passion and support, never ending.

Thank you to our staff, volunteers, Board, donors and other supporters for your ongoing commitment to community and the work that we accomplish together!

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

Volunteers and Staff

THANK YOU TO OUR WONDERFUL VOLUNTEERS AND STAFF!

We couldn’t do it without our amazing team of volunteers and staff!

Options had 590 volunteers in 2018. Instead of Service Awards, volunteers receive Milestone pins for giving 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 hours of their time. In 2018, 76 volunteers from the Crisis Line and Board of Directors received pins, with one Board Member reaching the 1000 hours of service level. This Board of Directors member was presented with a custom plaque to recognize their contribution to the agency.

Milestone Pins for Volunteers for 2018

Between April 1, 2017 and March 31, 2018, we had an incredible group of 76 volunteers who reached one of these milestones!

52

Crisis Line

17

4

1

1

1

Board of Directors

National Volunteer Week

Options celebrates National Volunteer Week every year. In 2018, our 590 volunteers received potted flowers in the theme that “ Volunteers Grow our Community” . Each program arranges their own volunteer appreciation activities. This year, HR was able to utilize Raiser’s Edge portal to track all our volunteers (including Board of Directors and practicum students).

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Staff Service

At the end of the 2017-2018 fiscal year, Options had on record 459 employees. This was an increase of 30 or 6% higher than 2016-2017 (at 429). The most significant changes were to the number of Permanent Full Time and Casual Staff.

# of Employees in 2016

Difference in 2017

Type of Employees

# of Employees

↑ 14

Full Time

247

233

↑ 1

Casual

102

101

↑ 4

Perm Part Time w/Benefits *

65

61

 4

Perm Part Time

34

37

 13

Temporary Positions

15

27

*permanent part time employees over 20 hours per week

Worth noting is the number of employees over age 65. Of the 16 employees in this category, 10 employees are 66 – 69 yrs old, 6 employees are over 70 yrs old. This past year we partnered with another community agency to offer “Are you Ready to Retire” workshop, with a focus on staff approaching retirement in the next 5 years. This was delivered by the Municipal Pension Plan – Pension Branch. Eleven (11) staff attended the workshop.

Age Range

# of Employees

<26

52

26-35

131

36-45

115

46-55

88

56-65

61

>65

16

There is no process in place for asking employees to self-identify as anything other than ‘male’ or ‘female’. This information is captured from employees government issued identification, shown at hire.

Gender

# of Employees

Other/Transgender Female

356

110

Male

Turnover Data

Sector Analysis This year Options had 101 employees leave employment, this was an increase of 13 employees The figure below displays the turnover numbers from 2017 in comparison with similar agencies within our sector (General Services). These figures are further displayed by union, non-union and management/excluded positions.

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

Options Community Services Society

Turnover Rate

In 2018, Options had 126 employees leave employment, this was an increase of 25 employees from 2017 (101 or 25% increase).  64 employees were Permanent Full Time or Permanent Part Time - 28 Full Time - 36 Part Time  34 employees were Casual  5 employees were Temporary Full Time or Temporary Part Time  23 employees were Summer Students hired on a Seasonal basis

Turnover by Status - 2 Year Comparison

Seasonal

Temporary

Casual

Permenant

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

2017 2018

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In 2018, Options had 14 more Permanent Full Time or Permanent Part Time employees and 14 additional casual staff than last year. The other interesting figure was the decrease in the number of temporary employees leaving us in 2018, at only 5 (from 12 last year). Seasonal employees stayed comparable at 23.

In 2018, the top five (5) positions with the greatest turnover were: 1. Shelter Workers (14) 2. Child & Youth Care Counsellors (&)

3. Mental Health Workers (7) 4. Master Level Counsellors (5) 5. Transition House Workers (4)

This year, the agency began utilizing ongoing job postings for 4 of the top 5 positions. Ongoing postings recruit casual Mental Health Workers, Transition House Workers, Shelter Workers and Child & Youth Care Counsellors. This ongoing recruitment adds to the casual pool and there are more workers to step into permanent roles, when needed. Another recruitment approach was to offer candidates that were unsuccessful at securing the permanent position they applied for, casual positions.

Employee Service Recognition

Employees receive recognition every 5 years. A total of 63 individuals were recognized in 2018. The award consists of a certificate and letter acknowledging the years of service and signed by the Executive Director and a member of the Board of Directors; a cheque is also given out, for which the amount increases every 5 years. After 25 years of service, employees also receive a specialty plaque with our agency colors/theme. Managers are encouraged to present the award publicly, and individualize the presentation of all the service awards. The figure below shows the number of service awards given out from 2013 to 2018.

Service Awards

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

5 Years

10 Years

15 Years

20 Years

25 Years

30 Years

35 Years

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

In 2018, Options celebrated four individuals who achieved 30 years of service (amazing). In addition, six individuals were recognized for 25 years of service.

This year, a significant number of employees reaching 10 years, more than double from previous year.

Employees at Options are also encouraged to publicly appreciate each other’s efforts, and has several initiatives that increase appreciation and recognition.

These include:  Regular potlucks and events celebrating the diversity of cultural backgrounds  Children, Staff and Team Christmas Party  Kudos at Leadership Team meetings

Staff Survey

We conducted our annual agency-wide staff survey. It is important to us at OCS that we have a positive work place, where staff feel supported, valued and able to do the best work they can. Our annual staff survey gives all staff a venue for open feedback and provides an opportunity to assess what we are doing well and what we can do better.

Highlights

Our 2018 staff survey proved to be successful, with 51% of staff responding (240 out of 473). In 2017, 230 of 436 staff responded.

When asked about their level of engagement at work, 85% of staff reported above average to extremely high levels of engagement. This percentage remains the same from our 2017 survey.

72% of staff report feeling an above average to extremely high connection to OCS’ mission.

Responses to the question “what single policy or practice does OCS do to best to improve your life at work”, 117 written responses were received. The majority of answers indicated the ability to have flexibility in their work, supporting work/life balance and offering opportunities for learning and professional development.

To the question “What keeps you at OCS?”, 35.27% said pay, 45.98% healthcare benefits, 40.18% professional development, 62.95% said culture and flexibility was selected by 75% of respondents. Please note that more than one response could be selected for this question.

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The percentages for each choice remained consistent this year with a variation of 1-2% for each category.

71% of respondents report an above average to extremely high sense of job satisfaction. This is a slight increase from the previous year of 1%.

When asked if staff would recommend working at Options to others, 81% responded yes. This is a decrease of 1% this year, however, we had 3% fewer responses to this question this year.

The feedback received regarding supervisors continues to be very positive. When asked “My supervisor recognizes and appreciates me and my work”, over 71% responded frequently to always. This remained consistent from our previous year. To the statement, “My supervisor provides frequent and useful feedback in a way that I can understand” over 70% indicated this happened frequently to always. This remained the same from our previous survey.

41% of respondents report above average to extremely high levels of stress at work. This is a decrease of 2% from the previous year.

When new employees were asked what attracted them to Options, the majority of answers referred to our culture, sense of community, opportunities for growth and our wide range of services.

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

Committee Highlights

Health & Safety Committee

Health & Safety (H&S) meetings are being held at various Options program sites in order to gain a greater and clearer understanding of the unique health and safety issues pertaining to individual programs. This promotes greater membership within the organization and participation amongst committee members. This committee is comprised of both frontline staff and management at Options. The H&S Committee provided orientation to new staff/practicum students/volunteers during Options Orientation Workshop. This orientation is facilitated by the Health & Safety Chair and other committee members. Quality Improvements  H&S reviewed Incident/Investigation reporting requirements.  H&S Manual/Orientation: The new Occupational H&S manual with updated materials and information has been approved and will be “rolled out” in the upcoming months. As well, the Health and Safety training component of the New Staff Orientation has been expanded and moved to the beginning of the presentation so that new staff have the time and opportunity to ask questions about health and safety. This also serves to stress the importance of health & safety as a whole to the organization.  Monthly Drills: Re-distribution of monthly drills was made to participate in the province- wide emergency preparedness “Shake Out” drill and to allow two months off from assigned drills to provide for AED, First Aid, Naloxone training “refreshers” for any staff who have this training but who would like to participate to practice their skills and gain confidence in their abilities. In order to ensure follow up on any items identified for improvement on the worksite inspection reports, a point person has been established for each site. An exhaustive look at the site inspection and drill reporting took place to ensure drills were being completed on a timely basis and reported correctly. A change to the reporting due dates was made to ensure the program-specific monthly drills were completed and submitted with the program site inspections.  Site Inspections: A review of site Muster Stations requirements took place to ensure best practices are being carried out within our Emergency Preparedness program. Site inspections were reviewed to ensure a mental health component regarding debriefing was emphasized and additional information regarding the organizations Critical Incident De- Brief Team contact information was available. The H&S committee will now share PQI quarterly H&S trends in incident reports to ensure our procedures are effective and on point.  Wellness: A Health and Safety email was created for all staff to receive Wellness and Mental Health Bulletins such as Pacific Blue Cross bulletins on Workplace Wellness. The committee now has a full year of monthly bulletins ready for distribution called “Take A

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Brake”. Topics include, Sneaker Away, Staircase Challenge, Get Inspired, Work on A Puzzle, Game, Craft as a Team, Positive Thinking, Eating Well at Work.  Training: New training for committee members effective April 1, 2019. In addition to ongoing JOH&S Committee training, members have expressed an interest this year in attending specific training on Incident Investigation/Reporting. New committee members were selected by program in order to ensure that all “ribbons” of service areas are represented. We welcomed two new committee members this report.

Community Profile Committee

The purpose of the Community Profile Committee is to increase awareness of the agency and its programs throughout the community.

Quality Improvements  Launched new website, adding mobile responsiveness, multilingual capacity, increased accessibility features  Successfully received Google Ad grant award, received $82,464.35 worth of online advertising  Launched an Options e-newsletter  Took over coordination and management of the WorkBC websites We’ve experienced very strong growth numbers through our website (one full year since relaunch) and social media channels year-over-year due to a number of strategies. Website 2017-18 2018-19 % change Users 80,656 149,775 85.7% Pageviews 284,874 399,315 40.2% % mobile traffic 44% 64% 44% LinkedIn Followers at year end 486 654 35% Impressions for posts 22,657 50,350 122% Referred to website 119 140 18% Facebook Followers at year end 5,532 6,074 10% Engaged users 17,278 32,830 90% Video views (30 sec or to end) 176 8,881 4946% Referred to website 4,406 7,190 63%

Our posts and information have continued to bring attention to special events, need for volunteers, recruitment and increased awareness around the community.

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

Staff Training and Development Committee

The Staff Training and Development Committee focuses on identifying and implementing training and education opportunities which are common across the agency.

Quality Improvements

Non-violent Crisis Intervention: Options CPI instructors started doing the hybrid training for staff who have had the course before. The hybrid training is more flexible for some programs as the staff can do a lot of the work online prior to the actual training day (about 2-3 hours) and then there is a brief review and the physical part of the CPI course is taught (another 3-4 hours). We aim to provide more training in the next fiscal year with the addition of 2 more instructors. Wisdom Within: This year, the Staff Development Committee relaunched Wisdom Within, sending out request emails and communicating the platform agency-wide during days such as Agency Day. We had three successful presentations: "Working as a Professional Helper", "An Introduction to Yoga-Informed Practice", and "How to Work with Interpreters", with 18 staff attending in total. We also had five additional presenters voice their interest with plans to share on topics in the future. Orientation Workshop: In February 2019, committee relaunched a new, revised Agency Orientation presentation. The new workshop contains group activities to learn about our mandatory policies, games & prizes, and agency videos. There is more emphasis on new staff seeking out more information about their new employer via our website and public drive. Mental Health First Aid: In May 2018, the agency began offering Mental Health First Aid. With two internal certified instructors, this 2-day course provided participants with skills to provide initial help to individuals experiencing mental health challenges related to substance misuse, depression, anxiety, trauma and psychosis. Agency Day March 1 & March 8, 2019: Agency Day was held on two different dates to accommodate the large number of employees and the need for programs to still be able to maintain program service delivery. Our main focus for the agenda was on accreditation and ensuring our staff felt prepared for our site visit from COA in June 2019.

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Social Wellness Committee

The Social Wellness Committee consists of a committed and energetic group of staff who assume most of the responsibility for planning and organizing staff social events, to promote inter-program sharing and strengthen employee engagement.

The committee organizes events throughout the year. This past year we focused our lunchtime events to coincide with various cultural and ethnic celebrations.

On average over 60 people attend our lunchtime events and over 220 staff attended the annual Christmas Party. The list of events included:  Summer Barbeques  Ramadan Celebration  Lunar New Year Celebration  Diwali  Cinco de Mayo 

Curry Cook-off Chili Cook-off

Indigenous Peoples Day

Golf Tournament

 Annual Christmas Events for staff and children

Performance Quality Improvement (PQI) Committee

Members of the PQI Committee are comprised of front-line staff, managers and senior managers who represent all program areas, and who are passionate and committed about quality improvement. The committee is co-chaired by the Director of Quality Improvement and the Manager of Quality Improvement. The committee attends to ongoing PQI developments, provides support and feedback to programs, and oversees, improves and monitors regular processes such as staff surveys, quarterly and annual reports and other key activities. The PQI Committee also champion the concept of PQI and make it more meaningful and relevant across the agency. During the 2018-2019 reporting period, the PQI Committee engaged in the review and development of new and existing policies, the revision of the PQI reporting templates and program annual plans, and identifying key agency-wide areas for improvement. There was also considerable attention paid to the processes involved in the re-accreditation that is taking place in June 2019.

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

Client and Stakeholder Satisfaction

Client Feedback (all programs)

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

96.9%

97.4%

98.2%

97.9%

Clients satisfied with OCS programs

97.2%

97.8%

98.8%

98.1%

 Clients who felt welcomed and respected

91.1%

90.1%

98.1%

96.7%

Clients who felt their goals were met

Funder and Community/Partner /Stakeholder Feedback (all programs)  Stakeholders satisfied with OCS programs and staff’s skills and service  Stakeholders who felt the programs were welcoming and respectful Stakeholders who would recommend an OCS program/refer to it again 

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

97.5%

98.1%

90.4%

97.6%

97.3%

97.2%

92.3%

96.6%

94.8%

96.0%

90.9%

95.2%

~results include “always” and “almost always” responses

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Programs and Services

COUNSELLING SERVICES

FAMILY COUNSELLING

Family Counselling provides short-term (up to 10 sessions max) individual, couple and family counselling to residents of Surrey with children 18 and under by referral via MCFD intake. The program works with people to achieve and foster healthier relationships, work through anxiety and depression, coping skills for separation and divorce, parent- child conflict resolution and increasing self-esteem. To maintain the child safely in the home a) Reduce or eliminate problems identified by program participants at the outset of service b) Improve the social, emotional and behavioural functioning of children and youth, caregivers and parents who participate in the program.

“I find the program and service very helpful. I walked in a very poor state of mind and left feeling great. Knowing when I need help, Options is always there to help not only my family but other families. There is nothing that needs to be changed. Everything you guys do is awesome.” (Family Counselling)

tcomes:

100% of families report increased ability to problem solve.

SUICIDE PREVENTION, EDUCATION AND COUNSELLING PROGRAM (SPEAC) SPEAC provides suicide risk assessment, crisis intervention and short-term counselling (up to 10 sessions max) to children and adolescents who are experiencing thoughts of suicide, are affected by the loss of a friend or family member to suicide, or who have made a recent suicide attempt. The SPEAC team also presents suicide prevention workshops in schools and community agencies in Surrey, White Rock, and Langley. Outcomes: a) To stop children and youth who are participating in the program from attempting or completing suicide; b) To improve the social, emotional, and behavioural functioning of children and youth who are participating in the program; c) To improve the social, emotional, and behavioural functioning of children and youth who have lost a loved one to suicide; d) To improve the caregiver’s/parent’s ability to maintain a safe physical and emotional environment for the client; e) To increase the ability of youth to recognize and respond appropriately to suicide risk indicators amongst their peers.

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

100% of children and youth report a decreased risk for suicide.

SEXUAL ABUSE COUNSELLING CENTRE (SAC) SAC provides both short-term and long-term (up to 2 years) counselling to children and youth from Surrey where sexual abuse has either been disclosed or is suspected. Support and psycho-educational information is also offered to non-offending family members.

“Thank you Options. You were amazing. We do not know what we would have done without you.” (SAC)

Outcomes: a) To maintain the child safely in the home; b) To improve the social emotional and behavioural functioning of children and youth who have been sexually abused; c) To stop re-victimization of sexually abused children and youth; d) To improve the ability of non-offending family members to cope with the stressors related to the disclosure of child sexual abuse in the family; e) To increase each non-offending family member’s knowledge of sexual abuse and related systems issues; and to increase the community’s awareness of sexual abuse and related social issues f) 100% of children report an increased ability to think clearly and make healthy decisions. Outputs Family Counselling 256 families served (this is a combination of individuals, couples and families) 100% report an increased ability to problem solve

SPEAC 100% report a decrease in intent to die by suicide 792 children/youth attended a workshop 291 external service providers who attended a workshop 70 workshops delivered 104 unique individuals served

SAC 161 clients served 100% report improved social, emotional and behavioural functioning 100% report an increased ability to think clearly and make healthy decisions

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

SPECIAL SERVICES FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

Special Services to Children and their Families is a goal-based program designed for children from 3-18 years who have a developmental disability and/or autism. The Special Services Program has been operating since 1981. There are three different components to this program:  one-to-one service  group services  one-to-one private intervention contract service This year we also expanded our service provision to include our newest program – Empower. This is a CLBC, (Community Living British Columbia), funded program working with adults who have a developmental disability in the CLBC service categories of “Community Inclusion and Skills Development”.

Outcomes: 

“Thank you for all the amazing support you provide all our kids and families.”

Child has increased integration into community 91%  Increased communication skills 95%  Increased life skills 86%  Increased social skills 90.5%  Demonstrates an increase in appropriate behaviours 81.25%

Outputs:

Diagnosis Breakdown Using the person’s diagnosis selections found on their details page

Options Community Services

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

FAMILY INTEGRATION SERVICES

FAMILY SUPPORT OUTREACH (FSO)

The FSO program provides outreach parenting, basic counselling, and support services to MCFD referred clients with children between the ages of 0-13, assessed at medium risk.The primary long-term goal of the FSO program is to work toward supporting families, educating parents, and promoting safe and healthy home environments. The immediate goals are to foster better communication and more positive interaction between

“ Excellent program …staff was kind, caring and very supportive. I feel more informed and in control… information was life changing!”

parents and children, educate parents on normal stages of child development, introduce more effective ways to respond to particular child behaviours, and connect families to other resources within our community.

166 people received service

2980 service units were delivered

 100% of participants report using more resources or places in the community to meet their family’s needs and 85% report experiencing less disruption in their lives.

MEASURE Question:

TARGET

RESULTS

5

# OF 5’S

# OF 3-4

# OF 1-2

On a scale of 1 to 5 (1 = dissatisfied, 5 = satisfied), please rate your experience with:

18

2

0

LEARNING NEW PARENTING SKILS

100%

20

0

0

USING MORE RESOURCES OR PLACES IN THE COMMUNITY TO MEET THEIR FAMILY’S NEEDS EXPERIENCING LESS CRISIS AND DISRUPTION IN THEIR LIVES

100%

17

3

0

73%

SUPPORT FOR PARENTS OF YOUNG CHILDREN (SPYC) SPYC offers one-to-one teaching and support to assist parents/grandparents and caregivers of children 0-6 years old in increasing their self-esteem and parenting skills, and to develop a sound community-based support system. Service is provided by Community Counsellors. In addition to one-to-one support, the program will also run four, 6 week group sessions based on attachment theory, with a focus on skill-building. The primary long-term goal of the SPYC program is to support and educate parents, while promoting safe and healthy home environments.

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Options Community Services

Outcomes Report 2018-2019

The immediate goals are to educate parents around the normal stages of child development, foster better communication and more positive interaction between parents and children, introduce more effective ways to respond to particular child behaviours, and connect families to other community resources.

 194 families received support and service  85% of clients are female  2888 service units were delivered

FAMILY STRENGTHENING AND DEVELOPMENT (FSD) FSD offers short-term, goal–focused interventions to assist families who are in immediate crisis and at risk of abusing or neglecting their children. The program supports families to learn and apply new and appropriate strategies to manage their family and practical needs. The purpose of this program is to reduce the risk for child maltreatment and enhance child safety by changing behaviours and increasing the skills of referred moderate to high risk, high needs families in Surrey. Services may be offered in the family home, a community setting or at our office. Services focus on practical strategies which will increase the family’s ability to be self-sustaining and stable.

382 families served

"Options Staff has been a joy to have in my home she has really helped me become a better me!"

67% clients in FSD were female

44% clients in FSD were aged 30-40

QUICK RESPONSE PROGRAM (QRP) QRP is a short term, goal-focused intervention to assist families who are in immediate crisis and at risk of abusing or neglecting their children. The service assists families to learn and apply new and appropriate strategies to manage their family and practical needs. Services can be provided in the family’s home, in other community settings, and in-office. Services focus on practical strategies which increase the family’s ability to be self-sustaining and stable.

144 families served

85% clients in QRP were female

“Great program! Options staff is amazing very helpful provided so much information I had no idea it was available. Thank you so much!”

47% clients in QRP were aged 30-40

Both FSD and QRP have staff members who can converse in English,Punjabi, Hindi, Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, French, and German.

Options Community Services

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Outcomes Report 2018-2019

This past year FSD/QRP delivered 15 groups and had a total of 138 group participants with a 77% graduation rate. Child-minding services were utilized this year with 32 children attending across all the groups offered.

SUPERVISED ACCESS PROGRAM (SAP) SAP provides visitation for children who are in the care of MCFD and their families (noncustodial parents) in Surrey. The long-term goal is to have the children who have been removed from their biological parents/caregivers and are in care of MCFD, to be reunified with their natural families. The programs immediate goals in visitation are:  to help facilitate positive interactions between family members  increase parenting education  to give visiting families an opportunity to spend time together in an atmosphere of safety and support. These goals are achieved by providing the opportunity for families to spend time together at either Options visitation rooms, MCFD offices, in the community or in the family home under the supervision of Options staff. NOBODY’S PERFECT PARENTING (NPP) NPP provides service to the parents, grandparents or caregivers of children 0-5 years of age, who have their child/children in their care at least 50% of the time. Groups are facilitated in multiple languages and have a multi-cultural focus. We also facilitate groups specifically for Dads. The primary long-term goal of the NPP program is to work toward healthier parent/child relationships, while promoting safe, healthy home environments. The immediate goals are to foster better communication and more positive interaction between parents and children, educate parents on normal stages of child development, introduce more effective ways to respond to particular child behaviours, and connect families to other resources within our community.  4257 service units delivered  105 unique individuals served

“The facilitators are very knowledgeable and covered each topic in detail.”

7 groups delivered

64 Individuals served

 94% report learning new parenting skills  100 % report that they were satisfied with the services provided.

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Options Community Services

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